The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

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Filiquarian Publishing, LLC., Dec 1, 2007 - Humor - 156 pages
3 Reviews
Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is a collection of humorous and entertaining essays written by popular English humorist Jerome K. Jerome. This work is considered widely to be on the of better works of Jerome, and uses the same style as Three Men in a Boat, but was not nearly as popular as that title. Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is highly recommended for those who enjoy the humorous writings of author Jerome K. Jerome and also for those who are discovering his writings for the first time.
  

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User Review  - Melissarochell - LibraryThing

There's something oddly satisfying about this book. Calming, interesting and humorous all at once. Two of these adjectives are not ones I tend to seek out in a book very often, but this man made it ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Praj05 - LibraryThing

Monday afternoons are most favorable to practice the art of idling. The anxiety of a fresh work week prevails over the dormancy of deadlines and you are back on detoxification diet after a carb loaded ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

II
7
III
15
IV
25
V
33
VI
41
VII
51
VIII
59
IX
71
X
87
XI
97
XII
107
XIII
119
XIV
131
XV
143

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About the author (2007)

Jerome K. Jerome was born in Walsall, Staffordshire, England on May 2, 1859. He grew up in London and had to leave school at the age of 14 because of his parents' death. Afterwards, he worked as a clerk, an actor, a journalist, and a school teacher. In 1885, he published his first book On the Stage - and Off: The Brief Career of a Would-Be Actor. This was followed by numerous plays, books, and magazine articles including Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, Three Men in a Boat, and Three Men on the Bummel. He founded the weekly magazine To-Day in 1893 and edited it and a monthly magazine called The Idler until 1898. He also worked as a lecturer. During World War I, he enlisted in the French army as an ambulance driver because he was rejected for active service in his own country. He published his autobiography My Life and Times in 1926. He suffered a paralytic stroke and a cerebral hemorrhage and died on June 14, 1927.

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