The Wilderness from Chamberlain Farm: A Story Of Hope For The American Wild (Google eBook)

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Island Press, Aug 1, 2001 - Nature - 440 pages
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Deep in the wildlands of northern Maine is a remote piece of land with a small point sheltering a shallow cove along the shore of an expansive lake. Used as a campsite by indigenous peoples for thousands of years, the land was cleared in the mid-1800s, developed into a lumber depot and named Chamberlain Farm. Following a period of neglect after a century of use by lumbermen, the area was turned into a rustic enclave for hunting and fishing enthusiasts. In recent years as civilization encroached, it became the focus of protection efforts by wilderness lovers who sought to ensure preservation and keep in it some semblance of its former wildness.In The Wilderness from Chamberlain Farm, historian Dean B. Bennett traces those transformations, bringing to life the people involved, their motivations, and the interconnected effects of their actions. Beginning 10,000 years ago with the retreat of the glaciers, Bennett offers an overview of the forces that shaped the land, and the visitors to and inhabitants of this place once known as Apmoojenegamook -- "lake that is crossed." We meet one of the first American owners of the property, David Pingree, and his agent E. S. Coe, who kept a tight rein on operations from the 1840s until the turn of the century. An acquaintance of Coe and visitor during that time was Henry David Thoreau, who passed through the area on one of his excursions in the Maine woods. We also are introduced to the indomitable Patty and Al Nugent, who staked a claim on the land and built a sporting camp with their own hands that has served as a haven for outdoorsmen from the 1930s to the present day. And we learn of the efforts of Senator Edmund S. Muskie and others to protect this wild river area, culminating in the creation of the Allagash Wilderness Waterway and its federal designation as the nation's first state-administered riverway in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.The dynamic history of the farm and its setting illuminate society's evolving perspective on the natural world around us. The Wilderness from Chamberlain Farm describes and explains the perspectives revealed by those attracted to the farm and its environment, and those who fought to protect the Allagash, offering a valuable lens through which to understand the changing relationship of people and the land.
  

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The Wilderness from Chamberlain Farm: A Story Of Hope For The American Wild

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A remote piece of land located in the Allagash Wilderness Waterway in northwestern Maine, Chamberlain Farm has undergone many changes since it served as a camping place for indigenous peoples. In ... Read full review

Contents

The Safe I
1
Kinship
13
Control
41
Oneness
239
Safekeeping
333
Postscript
341
Appendix B Wilderness Continuum
351
National Trends in Beliefs Attitudes and Values
367
Notes
375
About the Author
423
Copyright

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Page xiii - Generations to follow will judge us by our success in preserving in their natural state certain rivers having superior outdoor recreation values. The Allagash of Maine, the Suwannee of Georgia and Florida, the Rogue of Oregon, the Salmon of Idaho, the Buffalo of Arkansas, and the Ozark Mountain rivers in the State of Missouri are some of the waterways that should be kept as clean, wild rivers — a part of a rich outdoor heritage.
Page xiii - Buildings Crumble, Monuments Decay, Wealth Vanishes But Katahdin in All Its Glory Forever Shall Remain the Mountain of the People of Maine.

About the author (2001)

Dean B. Bennett is professor emeritus at the University of Maine at Farmington. Much of his professional life has been devoted to teaching and writing in the fields of science and environmental education, natural history, and human relationships with nature. His books include Allagash: Maine's Wild and Scenic River (Down East Books, 1994) and The Forgotten Nature of New England (Down East Books, 1996).

 Stewart L. Udall was elected to four terms as congressman from Arizona before being appointed by President John F. Kennedy to be secretary of the interior, a position he held for eight years during the administrations of President Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson. He is the author of The Quiet Crisis and many other works.

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