Loser

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jul 29, 2003 - Juvenile Fiction - 224 pages
92 Reviews

Just like other kids, Zinkoff rides his bike, hopes for snow days, and wants to be like his dad when he grows up. But Zinkoff also raises his hand with all the wrong answers, trips over his own feet, and falls down with laughter over a word like "Jabip."

Other kids have their own word to describe him, but Zinkoff is too busy to hear it. He doesn't know he's not like everyone else. And one winter night, Zinkoff's differences show that any name can someday become "hero."

  

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3 stars
13
2 stars
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Review: Loser

User Review  - Julie Sondra Decker - Goodreads

Donald Zinkoff would maybe be Don or Donnie to his friends, if he had any, but he's known as Zinkoff, and he's the school's loser. Loser as in he's weird, messes things up and doesn't really care that ... Read full review

Review: Loser

User Review  - Samantha - Goodreads

THIS BOOK It didn't make any sense at all. The book is about a kid named Donald Zinkoff, but for some odd reason, in the book, Jerry Spinelli decided to call the characters by their last names. So, as ... Read full review

All 10 reviews »

Contents

Section 19
109
Section 20
117
Section 21
119
Section 22
127
Section 23
133
Section 24
137
Section 25
143
Section 26
154

Section 9
28
Section 10
34
Section 11
42
Section 12
50
Section 13
60
Section 14
71
Section 15
78
Section 16
84
Section 17
94
Section 18
101
Section 27
161
Section 28
170
Section 29
177
Section 30
181
Section 31
187
Section 32
197
Section 33
206
Section 34
211
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jerry Spinelli received the Newbery Medal for Maniac Magee and a Newbery Honor for Wringer. His other books include Smiles to Go, Loser, Space Station Seventh Grade, Who Put That Hair in My Toothbrush?, Dump Days, and Stargirl. His novels are recognized for their humor and poignancy, and his characters and situations are often drawn from his real-life experience as a father of six children. Jerry lives with his wife, Eileen, also a writer, in Wayne, Pennsylvania.

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