Faces of Degeneration: A European Disorder, C.1848-1918

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jul 30, 1993 - History - 275 pages
1 Review
This book investigates the specific conception and descent of a language of "degeneration" from 1848 to 1918, with particular reference to France, Italy, and England. The author shows how in the refraction and wake of evolution and naturalism, new images and theories of atavism, "dégénérescence" and socio-biological decline emerged in European culture and politics. He indicates the wide cultural and political importance of the idea of degeneration, while showing that the notion could mean different things at different times in different places. Exploring the distinctive historical and discursive contexts in France, Italy, and England within which the idea was developed, the book traces the profound complex of political issues to which the concept of degeneration gave rise during the period from the revolutions of 1848 to the First World War and beyond.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

P. 57-58 Impt pour Bio de Veuillot

Contents

Contexts
1
FRANCE
35
Dégénérescence and revolution
37
Zolas prognosis
74
The wake of dégénérescence
97
ITALY
107
Lombrosos criminal science
109
ENGLAND
153
Fictions of degeneration
155
Crime urban degeneration and national decadence
176
Concluding remarks
222
Bibliography
241
Index
271
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information