The Golden Age of Engraving: A Specialist's Story about Fine Prints (Google eBook)

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The Baker & Taylor company, 1910 - Engravers - 314 pages
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Page 220 - TIGER, tiger, burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire? And what shoulder and what art Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
Page 250 - ... twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 57 - Here Reynolds is laid, and, to tell you my mind, He has not left a wiser or better behind ; His pencil was striking, resistless, and grand, His manners were gentle, complying, and bland : Still born to improve us in every part, His pencil our faces, his manners our heart. To coxcombs averse, yet most civilly steering, When they judged without skill, he was still hard of hearing: When they talked of their Raphaels, Corregios, and stuff, He shifted his trumpet,* and only took snuff.
Page 38 - Setting interest therefore aside, to which I never paid much attention, I must be indulged at present in following my affections. The only dedication I ever made was to my brother, because I loved him better than most other men. He is since dead. Permit me to inscribe this Poem to you.
Page 304 - Sculptura; or, The History and Art of Chalcography, and Engraving in Copper: with an ample Enumeration of the most renowned Masters and their Works. To which is annexed, A New Manner of Engraving, or Mezzotinto, Communicated by His Highness Prince Rupert to the Author of this Treatise.
Page 134 - Swift, that angling is always to be considered as "a stick and a string, with a fly at one end and a fool at the other.
Page 304 - Portraits; being a descriptive catalogue of these engravings from the Introduction of the Art to the early part of the present Century.
Page 46 - that the great principle of being happy in this world, " is, not to mind or be affected with small things.
Page 304 - THE GRAPHIC ARTS: A Treatise on the Varieties of Drawing, Painting, and Engraving in Comparison with each other and with Nature.
Page 233 - ... etcher. Every stroke he makes must tell strongly against him if it be bad, or prove him a master if it be good. In no branch of art does a touch go for so much. The necessity for a rigid selection is therefore constantly present in his mind. If one stroke in the right place tells more for him than ten in the wrong, it would seem to follow that that single stroke is a more learned stroke than the ten by which he would have arrived at his end." "The faculty of doing such work supposes a concentration...

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