Memorial of the Semi-centennial Anniversary of the American Colonization Society: Celebrated at Washington, January 15, 1867. With Documents Concerning Liberia (Google eBook)

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The Society, 1867 - African Americans - 191 pages
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Page 134 - The end of the institution, maintenance, and administration of government, is to secure the existence of the body politic; to protect it; and to furnish the individuals who compose it, with the power of enjoying, in safety and tranquillity, their natural rights and the blessings of life...
Page 137 - In order to prevent those who are vested with authority from becoming oppressors, the people have a right, at such periods and in such manner as they shall establish by their frame of government, to cause their public officers to return to private life; and to fill up vacant places by certain and regular elections and appointments.
Page 137 - Commonwealth in the most free, easy, cheap, expeditious and ample manner; and shall not be suspended by the Legislature, except upon the most urgent and pressing occasions, and for a limited time not exceeding twelve months.
Page 136 - The liberty of the press is essential to the security of freedom in a state': it ought not, therefore, to be restrained in this commonwealth.
Page 134 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural inherent and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 136 - THE people have a right to keep and to bear arms for the common defence. And as in time of peace armies are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be maintained without the consent of the legislature; and the military power shall always be held in an exact subordination to the civil authority, and be governed by it.
Page 134 - God according to the dictates of their own consciences, without obstruction or molestation from others ; all persons demeaning themselves peaceably, and not obstructing others in their religious worship, are entitled to the protection of law in the free exercise of their own religion, and no sect of Christians shall have exclusive privileges or preference over any other sect, but all shall be alike tolerated ; and no religious test whatever shall be required as a qualification for civil office, or...
Page 142 - Republic shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and such subordinate courts as the Legislature may from time to time establish.
Page 136 - Government ; and no law shall ever be made to restrain the right thereof; the free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man, and every citizen may freely speak, write, and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty.
Page 136 - No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duties ought to be established, fixed, laid, or levied, under any pretext whatsoever, without the consent of the people or their representatives in the legislature.

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