For Whom the Bell Tolls: [ Writer Wins Nobel Prize in Literature AWARD 1954 ]

Front Cover
Bantam Books, 1951 - Juvenile Fiction - 468 pages
14 Reviews

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to a republicanguerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia. Hemingway biographer Jeffrey Meyers writes that the novel is regarded as one of Hemingway's best works, along with The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms.

[Adaptations]

A film adaptation of Hemingway's novel, directed by Sam Wood, was released in 1943 starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman. It was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Actress; however, only the Greek actress Katina Paxinou won an Oscar for her portrayal of Pilar.
A television adaptation, directed by John Frankenheimer, was broadcast in two parts on CBS's Playhouse 90 in 1956, starring Jason Robards and Maria Schell as Robert Jordan and Maria, with Nehemiah Persoff as Pablo,Maureen Stapleton as Pilar, and Eli Wallach as the gypsy Rafael.
Another adaptation was made by the BBC in 1965 as a four-part serial (miniseries in American English).
Also, Takarazuka Revue adapted the novel as a musical drama, produced by Star Troupe and starring Ran Ootori as Robert Jordan and Kurara Haruka as Maria in 1978. The show was later revived in 2010 by Cosmos Troupe.
A song adaptation was written by American heavy metal band Metallica for their 1984 album Ride the Lightning.

[In popular culture]

In the German film Wir Sind Die Nacht a depressed character is reading For Whom the Bell Tolls and later commits suicide.

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Review: For Whom the Bell Tolls

User Review  - Leonard - Goodreads

Ernest Hemingway's FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS is not only a war novel but also a story of life, love, lost and ultimately death. Robert Jordan lives to fight with the republican guerrillas and he dies ... Read full review

Review: For Whom the Bell Tolls

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

You always know when you're watching a Tarantino movie because no matter where and when it's set, the characters always talk like they're in a Tarantino movie. Same with Hemingway: his writing tics ... Read full review

About the author (1951)

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 July 2, 1961) was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short stories, and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are considered classics of American literature.

 

Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers. In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms. In 1921 he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent, and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's first novel, was published in 1926.

 

After his 1927 divorce from Hadley Richardson, Hemingway married Pauline Pfeiffer. They divorced after he returned from the Spanish Civil War where he had been a journalist, and after which he wrote For Whom the Bell Tolls. Martha Gellhorn became his third wife in 1940. They separated when he met Mary Welsh in London during World War II. He was present at theNormandy Landings and the liberation of Paris.

 

Shortly after the publication of The Old Man and the Sea in 1952, Hemingway went on safari to Africa, where he was almost killed in two successive plane crashes that left him in pain or ill health for much of the rest of his life. Hemingway had permanent residences in Key West, Florida (1930s), and Cuba (1940s and 1950s). In 1959 he bought a house in Ketchum, Idaho, where he committed suicide in the summer of 1961.