The Congressional Globe, Part 2 (Google eBook)

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Blair & Rives, 1871 - United States
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Page 698 - States to leave any state, district, or place where his duties as an officer are required to be performed, or to injure him in his person or property on account of his lawful discharge of the duties of his office, or while engaged in the lawful discharge thereof, or to injure his property so as to molest, interrupt, hinder, or impede him in the discharge of his official...
Page 695 - ... we must resolve to incorporate into our plan those ingredients which may be considered as forming the characteristic difference between a league and a government; we must extend the authority of the Union to the persons of the citizens— the only proper objects of government.
Page 695 - This penalty, whatever it may be, can only be inflicted in two ways : by the agency of the courts and ministers of justice, or by military force : by the coercion of the magistracy, or by the coercion of arms. The first kind can evidently apply only to men ; the last kind must of necessity be employed against bodies politic or communities or states.
Page 651 - The United States shall guaranty to every State in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.
Page 681 - The President is authorized to prescribe such regulations for the admission of persons into the civil service of the United States as may best promote the efficiency thereof, and ascertain the fitness of each candidate in respect to age, health, character, knowledge, and ability for the branch of service into which he seeks to enter...
Page 594 - I, , do solemnly swear, in presence of Almighty God, that I will henceforth faithfully support, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States and the Union of the States thereunder...
Page 706 - ... the due course of justice in any State or territory, with intent to deny to any citizen of the United States the due and equal protection of the laws...
Page 702 - We are all of opinion that the authority to decide whether the exigency has arisen belongs exclusively to the President, and that his decision is conclusive upon all other persons. We think that this construction necessarily results from the nature of the power itself, and from the manifest object contemplated by the act of Congress.
Page 656 - States, conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by force the Government of the United States, or to levy war against them, or to oppose by force the authority thereof, or by force to prevent, hinder, or delay the execution of any law of the United States...
Page 699 - An offense, in its legal signification, means the transgression of a law. A man may be compelled to make reparation in damages to the injured party, and be liable also to punishment for a breach of the public peace, in consequence of the same act, and may be said, in common parlance, to be twice punished for the same offense.

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