Brave New World Revisited

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Mar 1, 2000 - Fiction - 130 pages
45 Reviews

When the novel Brave New World first appeared in 1932, its shocking analysis of a scientific dictatorship seemed a projection into the remote future.

Here, in one of the most important and fascinating books of his career, Aldous Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy. He scrutinizes threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion, and explains why we have found it virtually impossible to avoid them. Brave New World Revisited is a trenchant plea that humankind should educate itself for freedom before it is too late.

  

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Review: Brave New World Revisited

User Review  - Victoria Lopez - Goodreads

The book Brave New world by Aldous Huxley was a very eye opening read to me. Brave New World is about a man named Bernard Marx who thinks that his society is not normal. He spends a lot of time ... Read full review

Review: Brave New World Revisited

User Review  - Zeke - Goodreads

This book is a dystopian fiction, that is a great book to read. This book is set in the future in a world state, where they are not born but made in a factory and raised by the government. In this ... Read full review

Contents

OverPopulation
1
Quantity Quality Morality
13
OverOrganization
17
Propaganda in a Democratic Society
29
Propaganda Under a Dictatorship
37
The Arts of Selling
47
Brainwashing
59
Chemical Persuasion
69
Subconscious Persuasion
79
Hypnopaedia
89
Education for Freedom
101
What Can Be Done?
113
About Aldous Huxley
125
Brave New World Revisited 1958
129
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was born in Surrey, England, and is the author of many critically acclaimed books of fiction and nonfiction, including Crome Yellow, The Doors of Perception, and Island.

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