The Helicon of Love: A Selection from the Poets of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Google eBook)

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H.G. Clarke and Company, 66, Old Bailey., 1844 - English poetry - 123 pages
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Page 101 - WHEN LOVE, with unconfined wings, Hovers within my gates; And, my divine ALTHEA brings, To whisper at the grates; When I lie tangled in her hair, And fettered to her eye: The birds, that wanton in the air, Know no such liberty!
Page 46 - Love in my bosom like a bee Doth suck his sweet : Now with his wings he plays with me, Now with his feet. Within mine eyes he makes his nest, His bed amidst my tender breast ; My kisses are his daily feast, And yet he robs me of my rest. Ah, wanton, will ye?
Page 66 - HE that loves a rosy cheek, Or a coral lip admires, Or from star-like eyes doth seek Fuel to maintain his fires ; As old Time makes these decay, So his flames must waste away. But a smooth and steadfast mind, Gentle thoughts and calm desires, Hearts with equal love combined, Kindle never-dying fires. Where these are not, I despise Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes.
Page 53 - Saturn laugh'd and leap'd with him. Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew: Nor did I wonder at the lilies white, Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose; They were but sweet, but figures of delight, Drawn after you, you pattern of all those. Yet seem'd it winter still, and you away, As with your shadow I with these did play : XCIX.
Page 30 - Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee and be thy love.
Page 36 - Open the temple gates unto my Love, Open them wide that she may enter in, And all the posts adorn as doth behove, And all the pillars deck with garlands trim...
Page 63 - Or the nard in the fire? Or have tasted the bag of the bee? O so white, O so soft, O so sweet is she!
Page 50 - Since there's no help, come, let us kiss and part, Nay I have done, you get no more of me; And I am glad, yea glad with all my heart, That thus so cleanly I myself can free; Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows, And when we meet at any time again, Be it not seen in either of our brows That we one jot of former love retain.
Page 28 - COME live with me and be my love, And we will all the pleasures prove, That valleys, groves, hills and fields, Woods or Steepy mountains yields. And we will sit upon the rocks, Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks By shallow rivers, to whose falls Melodious birds sing madrigals. And I will make thee beds of roses, And a thousand...
Page 28 - Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle; A gown made of the finest wool Which from our pretty lambs we pull...

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