A new system of domestic cookery: formed upon principles of economy, and adapted to the use of private families (Google eBook)

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Printed by Norris & Sawyer, 1808 - 297 pages
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Page 233 - Give them clean water, or the milk of the rice, to drink ; bm the less wet the latter is when perfectly soaked, the better. By this method the flesh will have a clear whiteness which no other food gives ; and when it is considered how far a pound of rice will go, and how much time is saved by this mode, it will be found to be as cheap as barley-meal, or more so. The pen should be daily cleaned, and no food given for sixteen hours before poultry be killed.
Page 180 - Ketchup of the finest sort. Boil or simmer a gallon of the expressed juice of walnuts when they are tender, and skim it well ; then put in two pounds of anchovies...
Page 244 - ... of nutmeg, all finely powdered ; mix them with the marrow above prepared ; then put all the ingredients into a pewter pot, that holds three pints ; make a paste of white of egg and flour, and lay it upon a piece of rag. Over that must be another piece of linen to cover the top of the pot very close, that none of the steam may evaporate. Put the pot into a large copper pot with water, observing to keep it steady, that it may not reach to the covering of the pot that holds the marrow. As the water...
Page 238 - ... ready in a quart of water ; take off the skin, cut the white meat off when cold, and put into a marble mortar : pound it to a paste with a little of the water it was boiled in, season with salt, a grate of nutmeg, and the least bit of lemon peel.
Page 153 - Fish Gravy. Skin two or three eels, or some flounders ; gut and wash them very clean ; cut them into small pieces, and put into a saucepan. Cover them with water, and add a little crust of bread toasted brown, two blades of mace, some whole pepper, sweet herbs, a piece of lemon-peel, an anchovy or two, and a tea-spoonful of horse-radish. Cover close, and simmer; add a bit of butter and flour, and boil with the above. Savoury Jelly, to put over Cold Pies. Make it of a small bare knuckle of leg or...
Page 97 - ... not enough, take the meat off a sweet bone. Beat it well with a rolling-pin ; season with pepper and salt, and keep the fat and lean separate. Put it in layers, quite close up to the top : lay on the lid : cut the edge smooth round, and pinch it; bake in a slow soaking oven, as the meat is very solid. Directions for raising the crust will be given hereafter.
Page 249 - Do not cross, nor go upwards. The dirt of the .paper and the crumbs will fall together. Observe, you must not wipe above half a yard at a stroke, and, after doing all the upper part, go round again, beginning a little above where you left off. If you do not do it extremely lightly, you will make the dirt adhere to the paper.
Page 245 - Put into a brass pan a pint of sweet oil, four pennyworth of oil of almonds, half a pound of spermaceti, and set all over the fire till dissolved; then add the soap, and half an ounce of camphor that has first been reduced to powder by rubbing it in a mortar, with a few drops of spirits of wine or lavender-water, or any other scent.
Page 162 - ... finely shred ; beat as many fresh eggs, yolks and whites separately, as will make the above ingredients into a moist paste ; roll into small balls, and boil them in fresh lard, putting them in just as it boils up. When of a light brown, take them out, and drain them before the fire. If the suet be moist or stale, a great many more eggs will be necessary.
Page 117 - ... the batter and fry some of it with each slice. Currants, or sliced lemon, as thin as paper, make an agreeable change Fritters for company, should be served on a folded napkin in the dish. Any sort of sweetmeat, or. ripe fruit, may be made into fritters. Spanish Fritters. Cut the crumb of a French roll into lengths, as thick as your finger, in what shape you will.

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