Marriage Ceremonies in Morocco (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1914 - Marriage - 422 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
64
IV
85
V
136
VI
165
VII
193
VIII
225
IX
274
X
300
XI
319
Copyright

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Page 371 - This fact would lead to the development of a sentiment which would be powerful enough, as a rule, to prevent injurious unions a sentiment which would not, of course, show itself as an innate aversion to sexual connections with near relatives as such, but as an aversion on the part of individuals to union with others with whom they lived closely together from early childhood. These, as a matter of fact, would be blood-relations, and the result would consequently be the survival of the fittest.
Page 371 - ... was no bar to sexual intercourse. But variations, here as elsewhere, would naturally present themselves ; and those of our ancestors who avoided in-and-in breeding would survive, while the others would gradually decay and ultimately perish. Thus an instinct would be developed which would be powerful enough, as a rule, to prevent injurious unions.
Page 257 - On the bridegroom leaving his house, it was customary to throw an old shoe after him, and in like manner an old shoe after the bride on leaving her home to proceed to church, in order to...
Page 371 - In prohibiting incest the poor savages " blindly obeyed the impulse of the great evolutionary forces which in the physical world are constantly educing higher out of lower forms of existence and in the moral world civilisation out of savagery. If that is so, exogamy has been an instrument in the hands of that unknown power, the masked wizard of history, who by some mysterious process, some subtle alchemy, so often transmutes in the crucible of suffering the dross of folly and evil into the fine gold...
Page 314 - In the tribes where the husband permanently lives with his- wife's family (sixty- five out of three hundred and fifty), we should estimate that ceremonial avoidance between him and them might appear in nine cases, whereas it actually appears in fourteen cases. On the other hand, peoples where the husband at marriage takes his wife to his home (one hundred...
Page 314 - As the husband has intruded himself among a family which is not his own, and into a house where he has no right, it seems not difficult to understand their marking the difference between him and themselves by treating him formally as a stranger.
Page 26 - Plutarch, the bridegroom was dressed in women's clothes when he received his bride ;* whilst in Sparta, after the bride had been carried off by her husband, " the bridesmaid received her, cut her hair close to her head, dressed her in a man's cloak and shoes, and placed her upon a couch in a dark chamber...
Page 370 - The law only forbids men to do what their instincts incline them to do; what nature itself prohibits and punishes, it would be superfluous for the law to prohibit and punish. Accordingly we may always safely assume that crimes forbidden by law are crimes which many men have a natural propensity to commit.
Page 59 - If a young man leaves a widow, his brother generally offers to marry her. Custom does not oblige either him or her to make the match, nor can he prevent her from following another man. It seldom happens, however, that she refuses, for by such an union the family property is kept together.
Page 367 - India generally, we read that "when a child dies it is usually buried under the house threshold, in the belief that as the parents tread daily over its grave, its soul will be reborn in the family.

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