Postcolonial English: Varieties around the World (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 17, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 367 pages
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The global spread of English has resulted in the emergence of a diverse range of postcolonial varieties around the world. Postcolonial English provides a clear and original account of the evolution of these varieties, exploring the historical, social and ecological factors that have shaped all levels of their structure. It argues that while these Englishes have developed new and unique properties which differ greatly from one location to another, their spread and diversification can in fact be explained by a single underlying process, which builds upon the constant relationships and communication needs of the colonizers, the colonized, and other parties. Outlining the stages and characteristics of this process, it applies them in detail to English in sixteen different countries across all continents as well as, in a separate chapter, to a history of American English. Of key interest to sociolinguists, dialectologists, historical linguists and syntacticians alike, this 2007 book provides a fascinating new picture of the growth and evolution of English around the globe.
  

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
Postcolonial Englishes
8
Expanding circle
13
B
15
23 Alternative perspectives and issues
17
important in the long run than the recognition that once
26
ignore all the important differences from one historical context territory
29
respectively The STL population regard themselves as full members and
34
55 The Philippines
140
165 It is indicative that in
144
14 observed this a while ago and if Baldauf 2004
171
The complexity of the sociolinguistic constellations in South Africa
173
As before in the case of India the Dynamic Model
175
This may in
185
510 Kenya
189
Thus during this period initial if highly restricted bilingualism
191

bilingualism develops predominantly among a minority of the local
35
they entail an everincreasing range of contacts with members of
37
95 I call
49
245 The
58
first used to be a foreign temporary destination has now
60
related to broader issues of language use in a given
65
developments are a political issue and hence conflicting opinions will
68
4 Linguistic aspects of nativization
71
of almost 70 varieties worldwide Schneider et al 2004 for
72
Pronunciation tendencies by language types
77
The last type of lexical expansion to be mentioned here
82
number of speakers like the ruts of a wagon
86
421 Degrees of difference
91
with exceptional frequency Such distributional relations are precisely
93
linguistic processes
97
be clear that most of these factors are closely related
101
England and l vocalization in parts of West Africa which
102
case studies
113
51 Fiji
114
614 Secondly despite the limited impact of
120
53 New Zealand
127
Dialect mixture and koineization shaped early New Zealand English as
128
respects New Zealand usage is found to be variable but
131
Taiwan
134
2534 Michieka 2005183 Descriptive work on properties of
197
5123 Phase 3 late 1940s
204
5141 Phase 1 1627ca 1650
219
5143 Phase 4 1961
225
2
229
Greenland ICELAND
239
the British who came later could build upon or inherit
240
5164 Phase 4 ca 1920ca 1970
245
the emergence
251
Lumbees do have a distinct ethnolinguistic identity which is expressed
254
happened practically all the time koineization occurred so in a
261
and of course Spanish place names in Florida including the
264
in North America there prevails not only the
270
632 Identity constructions
275
633 Sociolinguistic conditions
276
634 Linguistic effects
278
differences between varieties
282
Similar movements can be found elsewhere the Cajun Renaissance to
294
Signaling endangered local identities through language
297
a great expansion geographically and phonologically in the second half
300
research eg Wolfram 1984 Leap 1993 identified unmarked tense in
303
218 and enjoys strong covert prestige SJ Roberts
307
7 Conclusion
309

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Philippine English
Margarete Misch
Limited preview - 2008

About the author (2007)

Edgar W. Schneider is Professor and Chair of English Linguistics in the Department of English and American Studies, University of Regensburg.