The works of Jonathan Swift, containing additional letters, tracts, and poems, with notes, and a life of the author, by W. Scott (Google eBook)

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1814
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Page 189 - If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things?
Page 276 - I ought to think, that it is time for me to have done with the world, and so I would if I could get into a better before I was called into the best, and not die here in a rage, like a poisoned rat in a hole.
Page 39 - I have ever hated all nations, professions, and communities ; and all my love is toward individuals ; for instance, I hate the tribe of lawyers, but I love Counsellor Such-a-one, and Judge Such-a-one : It is so with physicians, (I will not speak of my own trade,) soldiers, English, Scotch, French, and the rest. But principally I hate and detest that animal called man ; although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.
Page 280 - I remember when I was a little boy I felt a great fish at the end of my line which I drew up almost on the ground, but it dropped in, and the disappointment vexes me to this very day, and I believe \ it was the type of all my future disappointments.
Page 44 - Our friend Gay is used as the friends of Tories are by Whigs and generally by Tories too. Because he had humour, he was supposed to have dealt with Dr. Swift, in like manner as when any one had learning formerly, he was thought to have dealt with the devil...
Page 225 - ... in England.* As to the return of his health and vigour, were you here, you might inquire of his hay-makers ; but as to his temperance, I can answer that (for one whole day) we have had nothing for dinner but mutton broth, beans and bacon, and a barn-door fowl.
Page 307 - Now as I love you better than most I have ever met with in the world, and esteem you too the more, the longer I have compared you with the rest of the world, so inevitably I write to you more negligently, that is, more openly, and what all but such as love one another will call writing worse. I smile to think how Curll would be bit, were our epistles to fall into his hands, and how gloriously they would fall short of every ingenious reader's expectations!
Page 40 - Upon this great foundation of misanthropy (though not in Timon's manner) the whole building of my travels is erected ; and I never will have peace of mind till all honest men are of my opinion...
Page 350 - I could possibly pay the King to endeavour to support truth and innocence in his house, particularly when the King and Queen both told me that they had not read Mr.
Page 276 - Pray, my lord, how are the gardens ? have you taken down the mount, and removed the yew hedges ? Have you not bad weather for the spring corn ? Has Mr. Pope gone farther in his Ethic Poems ?* and is the head-land sown with wheat ? and what says Polybius ? and how does my Lord St.

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