Historical Tales of the Wars of Scotland, and of the Border Raids, Forays, and Conflicts, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Fullarton, 1849 - Scotland
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Page 388 - Though bill-men ply the ghastly blow, Unbroken was the ring; The stubborn spear-men still made good Their dark impenetrable wood, Each stepping where his comrade stood, The instant that he fell.
Page 388 - While many a broken band Disorder'd, through her currents dash, To gain the Scottish land ; To town and tower, to down and dale, To tell red Flodden's dismal tale, And raise the universal wail. Tradition, legend, tune, and song Shall many an age that wail prolong : Still from the sire the son shall hear Of the stern strife, and carnage drear Of Flodden's fatal field, Where shiver'd was fair Scotland's spear And broken was her shield.
Page 382 - Bruce, to rule the fight, And cry " Saint Andrew and our right !" Another sight had seen that morn, From Fate's dark book a leaf been torn...
Page 388 - Then did their loss his foemen know ; Their king, their lords, their mightiest low, They melted from the field as snow, When streams are swoln and south winds blow, Dissolves in silent dew.
Page 278 - General first called to him, thinking he might owe him some ill-will, on account of his father being in the service of the royal family. He added, that Cromwell had been so very kind and familiar with him, that he ventured to ask him, what the officer had said to him in the church. "He proposed," said Cromwell, "to pull forth the minister by the ears; and I answered, that the preacher was one fool and he another.
Page 417 - God forbid," the merchant said, " I fear your aim that you will miss : God bless you from his tyranny, for little you think what man he is. " He is brass within and steel without, his ship most huge and mighty strong, With eighteen pieces of ordnance he carrieth on each side along : With beams for his top-castle, as also being huge and high, That neither English nor Portugal can Sir Andrew Barton pass by."
Page 396 - Young, master glazier to her majesty, feeling a sweet savour to come from thence, and seeing the same dried from all moisture, and yet the form remaining, with the hair of the head, and beard red, brought it to London to his house in Wood Street, where for a time he kept it for the sweetness, but in the end caused the sexton of that church to bury it amongst other bones taken out of their charnel, &c.
Page 153 - House, and observing this posture, I told him I thought it did give us an opportunity and advantage to attempt upon the Enemy. To which he immediately replied, That he had thought to have said the same thing to me. So that it pleased the Lord to set this apprehension upon both of our hearts, at the same instant. We called for Colonel Monk, and showed him the thing: and coming to our quarters at night, and demonstrating our apprehensions to some of the Colonels, they also cheerfully concurred.
Page 388 - Linked in the serried phalanx tight, Groom fought like noble, squire like knight, As fearlessly and well ; Till utter darkness closed her wing O'er their thin host and wounded king. Then skilful Surrey's sage commands Led back from strife his shattered bands ; And from the charge they drew, As mountain-waves from wasted lands Sweep back to ocean blue.
Page 161 - Of blazing taper thro' its windows beams, And quivers on the undulating wave : But naked stand the melancholy walls, Lash'd by the wintry tempests, cold and bleak, That whistle mournful thro' the empty halls, And piece-meal crumble down the tow'rs to dust.

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