The Iliad, tr. by mr. Pope. [With notes partly by W. Broome. Preceded by] An essay on ... Homer [by T. Parnell]. (Google eBook)

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Page xiii - Homer and that of his work ; but when they come to assign the causes of the great reputation of the Iliad, they found it upon the ignorance of his times and the prejudice of...
Page vii - ... him, and in proportion to his degree in that we are to admire him. No author or man ever excelled all the world in more than one faculty ; and as Homer has done this in invention, Virgil has in judgment. Not that we...
Page xv - Tis a great Secret in Writing to know when to be plain, and when poetical and figurative; and it is what Homer will teach us if we will but follow modestly in his Footsteps.
Page xxi - For to satisfy such as want either is not in the nature of this undertaking, since a mere modern wit can like nothing that is not modern, and a pedant nothing that is not Greek.
Page xviii - ... known a mark of the author on the one hand, nor to offend the reader too much on the other. The repetition is not ungraceful in those speeches where the dignity of the speaker renders it a sort of insolence to alter his words ; as in the messages from Gods to men...
Page vii - I hope, in what has been said of Virgil, with regard to any of these heads, I have no way derogated from his character.
Page xviii - This is indeed one of the most exquisite beauties of poetry and attainable by very few; I know only of Homer eminent for it in the Greek, and Virgil in Latin. I am sensible it is what may sometimes...
Page xx - But the fate of great geniuses is like that of great ministers, though they are confessedly the first in the commonwealth of letters, they must be envied and calumniated only for being at the head of it. That which in my opinion ought to be the endeavour of any one who translates Homer, is above all things to keep alive that spirit and fire which makes his chief character...
Page xiv - ... the diction and versification only are his proper province, since these must be his own, but the others he is to take as he finds them.
Page xix - I doubt not many have been led into that error by the shortness of it, which proceeds not from his following the original line by line, but from the contractions above mentioned. He sometimes omits whole similes and sentences...

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