Chambers's Pocket Miscellany, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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W. and R. Chambers, 1852
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Page 112 - They now alight, but the next moment, as if suddenly alarmed, they take to wing, producing by the flappings of their wings a noise like the roar of distant thunder, and sweep through the forests to see if danger is near. Hunger, however, soon brings them to the ground. When alighted, they are seen industriously throwing up the withered leaves in quest of the fallen mast.
Page 8 - Far in the bosom of the deep, O'er these wild shelves my watch I keep; A ruddy gem of changeful light, Bound on the dusky brow of night, The seaman bids my lustre hail, And scorns to strike his timorous. sail.
Page 188 - Often in after-life has the sight nf him smote me as I passed by him ; and often have I resolved to make him some reparation ; but it ended in good resolutions. Though I never renewed my acquaintance with him, I often saw him, for he filled some inferior office in one of the courts of law at Edinburgh. Poor fellow ! I believe he is dead ; he took early to drinking.
Page 113 - Here and there the people employed in plucking and salting what had already been procured were seen sitting in the midst of large piles of these birds. Many trees two feet in diameter, I observed, were broken off...
Page 110 - I was astonished at their appearance. They were flying with great steadiness and rapidity at a height beyond gunshot, in several strata deep; and so close together that could shot have reached them, one discharge could not have failed of bringing down several individuals. From right to left, as far as the eye could reach, the breadth of this vast procession extended, seeming everywhere equally crowded.
Page 45 - Why dost thou heap up wealth, which thou must quit, Or, what is worse, be left by it ? Why dost thou load thyself, when thou'rt to fly, Oh man, ordain'd to die ? Why dost thou build up stately rooms on high, Thou who art under ground to lie ? Thou sow'st and plantest, but no fruit must see, For death, alas ! is sowing thee.
Page 111 - I sat for more than an hour, but instead of a diminution of this prodigious procession, it seemed rather to increase both in numbers and rapidity; and anxious to reach Frankfort before night, I rose and went on. About four o'clock in the afternoon I crossed the Kentucky River, at the town of Frankfort, at which time the living torrent above my head seemed as numerous and as extensive as ever. Long after this I observed them in large bodies, that continued to pass for six or eight minutes, and these...
Page 46 - Proud poverty, that tinsel bravery wears ! And, like a rainbow, painted tears ! Be prudent, and the shore in prospect keep ; In a weak boat trust not the deep ; Plac'd beneath envy, above envying rise | Pity great men, great things despise.
Page 138 - Souter-fell, and became visible at a place called Knott ; they then moved in regular troops along the side of the fell, till they came opposite to Blakehills, when they went over the mountain. Thus they described a kind of curvilineal path ; and both their first and last appearances were bounded by the top of the mountain.
Page 133 - We retained our position, kept our eyes fixed on the same spot, and in a little time the two figures again stood before us, and were joined by a third. Every movement that we made by bending our bodies, these figures imitated, but with this difference, that the phenomenon was sometimes weak and faint, sometimes strong and well defined.

References from web pages

Templeman Library Special Collections-Catharine Crowe
... Do as you would be done by; IN: Chambers's Pocket Miscellany, v.22, 1853 ... A penny saved is a penny gained-is it?; IN: Chambers's Pocket Miscellany, ...
library.kent.ac.uk/ library/ special/ html/ specoll/ crowelst.htm

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