All Consuming Images: The Politics of Style in Contemporary Culture

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Basic Books, 1999 - Social Science - 306 pages
6 Reviews
Discusses the evolution of style, from its former limited position in the ranks of the aristocratic elite to its pervasive role in everyday life, where it has become a vital mechanism for the transmission of social, economic, and political power
  

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Review: All Consuming Images: The Politics Of Style In Contemporary Culture

User Review  - Ikenna Nwamba - Goodreads

very interesting, useful in understanding american consumer culture Read full review

Review: All Consuming Images: The Politics Of Style In Contemporary Culture

User Review  - Petter Nordal - Goodreads

Ewen places the notion of style within its economic and social context, arguing that larger businesses developed our current conception of style in the early twentieth century in order to sell goods ... Read full review

Contents

V
13
VI
24
VII
26
VIII
32
IX
37
X
41
XI
43
XII
47
XXIV
151
XXV
153
XXVI
157
XXVII
161
XXVIII
176
XXIX
185
XXX
199
XXXI
209

XIII
55
XIV
57
XV
71
XVI
78
XVII
85
XVIII
101
XIX
109
XX
111
XXII
120
XXIII
135
XXXII
217
XXXIII
233
XXXIV
239
XXXV
246
XXXVI
259
XXXVII
273
XXXVIII
287
XXXIX
297
Copyright

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Page xxxi - Photographs have the kind of authority over imagination to-day, which the printed word had yesterday, and the spoken word before that. They seem utterly real.
Page xxxiii - It has fixed the most fleeting of our illusions, that which the apostle and the philosopher and the poet have alike used as the type of instability and unreality. The photograph has completed the triumph, by making a sheet of paper reflect images like a mirror and hold them as a picture.
Page xxxi - The making of one general will out of a multitude of general wishes is not an Hegelian mystery... but an art well known to leaders, politicians, and steering committees. It consists essentially in the use of symbols which assemble emotions after they have been detached from their ideas.
Page xxxiv - By close-ups of the things around us, by focusing on hidden details of familiar objects, by exploring commonplace milieus under the ingenious 249 guidance of" the camera, the film, on the one hand, extends our comprehension of the necessities which rule our lives; on the other hand, it manages to assure us of an immense and unexpected field of action.

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About the author (1999)

Stewart Ewen is professor of media studies and chair of the Department of Communications at Hunter College. He is also a professor in the Ph.D. programs in history and sociology at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He is the author of the acclaimed Captains of Consciousness, Channels of Desire, and All Consuming Images, the last of which provided the basis for Bill Moyers's award-winning PBS series The Public Mind. He lives in New York City.

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