The Legendary Ballads of England and Scotland (Google eBook)

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John S. Roberts
Frederick Warne & Company, 1868 - Folk songs, English - 628 pages
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Page 226 - In behint yon auld fail dyke, I wot there lies a new-slain knight; And naebody kens that he lies there, But his hawk, his hound, and his lady fair. 'His hound is to the hunting gane, His hawk, to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady's ta'en another mate, So we may mak our dinner sweet. 'Ye'll sit on his white hause-bane, And I'll pike out his bonny blue een. Wi' ae lock o' his gowden hair, We'll theek our nest when it grows bare.
Page 178 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet...
Page 191 - With that, there came an arrow keen Out of an English bow, Which struck Earl Douglas to the heart, A deep and deadly blow ; Who never spake more words than these, " Fight on, my merry men all ; For why, my life is at an end, Lord Percy sees my fall.
Page 116 - Curst be the heart that thought the thought, And curst the hand that fired the shot, When in my arms Burd Helen dropt, And died to succour me ! 0 think na ye my heart was sair, When my love dropt down and spak' nae mair ! There did she swoon wi' meikle care, On fair Kirconnell lea.
Page 1 - Now, ever alake! my master dear, I fear a deadly storm! I saw the new moon late yestreen, Wi' the auld moon in her arm; And if we gang to sea, master, I fear we'll come to harm.
Page 132 - Up then crew the red, red cock, And up and crew the gray; The eldest to the youngest said,
Page 433 - An old song, made by an aged old pate, Of an old worshipful gentleman who had a great estate, That kept a brave old house at a bountiful rate, And an old porter to relieve the poor at his gate.
Page 469 - O hold your hand, Lord William ! ' she said, ' For your strokes they are wond'rous sair ; True lovers I can get many a ane, But a father I can never get mair.
Page 366 - O they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk mirk night, and there was nae stern light, And they waded through red blude to the knee ; For a' the blude that's shed on earth Rins through the springs o
Page 39 - O, these are hard questions for my shallow witt, Nor I cannot answer your grace as yet : But if you will give me but three weekes space, He do my endeavour to answer your grace. Now three weeks...

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