Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1889 - Greek language - 464 pages
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Page 53 - ... occurrences. The prevailing view is, if we except certain monographs upon the subject, best set forth by Goodwin in his Moods and Tenses, 155, 156, 157, and I accordingly make the presentation there given the basis of my remarks. Goodwin explains this use of the aorist by saying that it gives "a more vivid statement of general truths by employing a distinct case or several distinct cases in the past to represent (as it were) all possible cases, and implying that what has occurred is likely...
Page 147 - TO FACT. 1397. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis has the adverb av. The imperfect here refers to present time or to an act as going on or repeated in past time, the aorist to a simple occurrence in past time, and the (rare) pluperfect to an act completed in past or present time. -Eg...
Page 170 - Here the protasis has the subjunctive with av after present tenses, and the optative with et after past tenses. The apodosis has the present or imperfect indicative, or some other form which implies repetition.
Page viii - whose writings have thrown light upon most of the dark places in Greek Syntax.
Page 147 - With Supposition contrary to Fact. 222. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis takes the adverb av.
Page 165 - The future as an emphatic form is especially common, when the condition contains a strong appeal to the feelings or a threat or a warning' GOODWIN, Moods and Tenses, 447.
Page 397 - The second person singular of this future with o цу was used by the dramatists as a prohibition, without abandoning the sense which the future can always have in both positive and negative commands. In these prohibitions the future indicative, in which they had their origin, is generally used ; but the subjunctive occasionally occurs, being analogous to the ordinary aorist subjunctive with...
Page 407 - The form without v is used when the infinitive is the principal word, on which the chief force of the expression falls, while the leading verb is an auxiliary which we can express by ought, might, could, or by an adverb. 2. On the other hand, when the chief force falls on the necessity, propriety, or possibility of the act, and not on the act itself, the leading verb has v, like any other imperfect in a similar apodosis.1 Examples of the latter use are generally regular.
Page 393 - But for the eight cases of independent fir) that have been quoted, we should never know that the construction existed between Homer and Plato. We have good ground for believing that it remained as a colloquial idiom in the language, though it seldom appeared in literature until Plato revived it and restored it to common use as a half-sarcastic form of expressing mildly a disagreeable truth. In Plato the construction is not confined to this peculiar sense, for we find cases in which honest apprehension...
Page 254 - In an indirect quotation or question the original words conform to the construction of the sentence in which they are quoted. Thus the words ravra ov\opai may be quoted either directly, Xe'yet тч "т air a oii\oua i," or indirectly, Xt'y rts oTt ravTa ov\frat or фтуоч тч?

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