Berlusconi's Shadow: Crime, Justice and the Pursuit of Power

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Allen Lane, 2004 - Berlusconi - 336 pages
3 Reviews
As one of the first investigative journalists to publicly question Berlusconi's fitness for government, Economist writer David Lane helped sparked an uproar in Italy. Now, after years of research and using many unique documents and material, including numerous in-depth interviews with senior magistrates, top lawyers and a former President, he reveals the truth about Berlusconi's life and career: his dubiously acquired wealth and secret offshore companies; his shadowy business associates; his links with noted mafia figures; his extreme right-wing contacts and lingering sympathy for the high days of Italian Fascism; his scandalous manipulation of the legal system; and the staggering conflicts of interest that enable him to exploit his money and media to silence opposition. Berlusconi's Shadow is also an exploration of the dark underside of Italy today: a nation still steeped in violence and corruption, where bribery and backhanders are commonplace and the Mafia seems unstoppable. It is a crisis which, Lane shows, matters now more than ever and we cannot afford to ignore.

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Review: Berlusconi's Shadow

User Review  - Susanna Nocchi - Goodreads

I must say I could not complete this book. Nothing to do with the style or the author, anyway. After about 60 pages I realised I had had enough with the main character and didn't really want to read or hear anymore about him. As simple as that. Read full review

Review: Berlusconi's Shadow

User Review  - Will James - Goodreads

A really disturbing book, that shows just how corrupt Italian politics is, especially with Berlusconi at the heart of it all. Made me glad I don't live in Italy. Read full review

Contents

Mafia
8
Success
41
Corruption
76
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

David Lane has been Italy Business and Finance Correspondent for the Economist from 1994 to the present.

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