Claude-Nicolas Ledoux: architecture and utopia in the era of the French Revolution

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Birkhäuser-Publishers for Architecture, 2006 - Architecture - 159 pages
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Architect of the French revolution, Claude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736 1806) was also one of the most revolutionary architects of the eighteenth century. His famous guard and customs houses are familiar to every traveler to Paris, and his Saltworks at Chaux an important architectural pilgrimmage site. His concept of an architecture parlante, or "speaking architecture," one that clearly symbolizes its function, has in uenced generations of architects. This concept has served as a source of inspiration for unusual designs, especially since the 1930s, when Ledoux was rediscovered by Emil Kaufmann in his famous study "From Ledoux to Le Corbusier." Claude-Nicolas Ledoux is an accessible portrait of the forerunner of modernity by the great architectural theorist and historian Anthony Vidler.

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Contents

PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION
6
CLASSICAL MAXIMS
15
EMBLEMS OF NOBILITY
23
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Anthony Vidler is Dean and Professor of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at The Cooper Union, New York. He is the author of "Warped Space: Art, Architecture, and Anxiety in Modern Culture" (2000), and "The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely" (1992), both published by The MIT Press, and other books.

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