The history and literature of the Crusades, from the Germ., ed. by lady Duff Gordon (Google eBook)

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1861
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Page 189 - Godfrey refused the name and ensigns of royalty in a city where his Saviour had been crowned with thorns, is first mentioned in this fragment.
Page 9 - ... possessions of his neighbour and his vassals; and so the old evils of anarchy and violence grew afresh out of the remedy which had been devised to meet them. The " monarchies sank into impotence; petty, lawless tyrants trampled all social order under foot," says a recent historian of this period, " and all attempts after scientific instruction and artistic pleasures were as effectually crushed by this state of general insecurity as the external well-being and material life of the people. This...
Page 104 - Roman law, conceived the idea of a state complete within itself, and strong in the name of the common weal, a complete contrast to the existing condition of Europe, where all the monarchies were breaking up, and the crowned priest reigned supreme over a crowd of petty princes. Under these circumstances he appeared, foreshadowing modern thoughts deep in the •middle ages, like a fresh mountain breeze dispersing the incense-laden atmosphere of the time. This discrepancy caused the greatness and the...
Page 119 - ... ransoming the prisoners. As may easily be imagined, the Christians were deeply exasperated by such a peace ; the Turks rejoiced, and only Saladin looked forward with anxiety to the future, and feared dangerous consequences from the duration of even the smallest Christian dominion in the East. The most active and friendly intercourse, rarely disturbed by suspicion, soon began between the two nations. On the very scene of the struggle mutual hatred had subsided, commercial relations were formed,...
Page 112 - Christian entrenchments ; he was driven back with great loss, whereupon he permitted the besieged to capitulate. The town surrendered, with all its stores, after a siege of nearly three years' duration ; the heroic defenders still remaining, about three thousand in number, were to be exchanged, within the space of forty days, for two thousand captive Christians, and a ransom of two hundred thousand pieces of gold. The war, according to all reports, had by this time cost the Crusaders above thirty...
Page 10 - ... historian of this period, " and all attempts after scientific instruction and artistic pleasures were as effectually crushed by this state of general insecurity as the external well-being and material life of the people. This was a dark and stormy period for Europe, merciless, arbitrary, and violent. It is a sign of the prevailing feeling of misery and hopelessness that, when the first thousand years of our era were drawing to their close, the people in every country in Europe looked with certainty...
Page 107 - Frankish sword could achieve, he had done by the mere shadow of his approach : he had forced from Saladin a confession of inferiority. But he was not destined to see the realization of his endeavours here, any more than in Europe. His army had entered Cilicia, and was preparing to cross the rapid mountain torrent of the Seleph. On the 10th of June, 1190, they marched slowly across the narrow bridge, and the Emperor, impatient to get to the front, urged his horse into the stream, intending to swim...
Page 127 - But we now say, with St. Bernard, " It is better to struggle against the sinful lusts of the heart, than to conquer Jerusalem.
Page 100 - ... pouring into the Christian seaport towns. In the first place the two military and religious Orders, the Templars and the Knights of St. John, had collected munitions of war of every kind from all their European possessions, and increased the number of their mercenaries to fourteen thousand men. King Guy also had ransomed himself from captivity and had gone to Tripoli, where by degrees the remnant of the Syrian barons, and pilgrims of all nations, gathered round him. They took the right resolution,...
Page 100 - ... unmoved by religious enthusiasm, and equally free from weakness or indecision ; so that under his command the inhabitants of the city repulsed every attack with increasing assurance and resolution. Saladin hereupon determined to try starvation, which a strict blockade by sea and land was to cause in the town; but in June, 1188, the Sicilian fleet appeared, gave the superiority by sea to the Christians, and brought relief to Tyre. The Sultan retreated, and marched through the defenceless provinces...

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