An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of Understanding ; Collated with Desmaizeaux's Ed. To which is Prefixed the Life of the Author (Google eBook)

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Mundell & Son, 1801 - 308 pages
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Contents

Fourthly Of real Existence
7
Knowledge actual or habitual
8
And
10
Secondly Received Hypotheses
11
The coming to the Use of Reason not the Time v
12
Particular Propositions concerning Existence are know
13
Such less general Propositions known before these uni
18
That a man should be busy in thinking and yet
19
Difference of Mens Discoveries depends upon the dif
22
Not innate because not universally assented
24
A constant Petermination to a Pursuit of Happiness no Abridgment of Liberty
50
The Necflity of pursuing true Happiness the Founda tion jf all Liberty
51
The Feason of
52
Government of our Passions he right Improvement of Liberty
53
How Men come to pursue different Courses
54
Kow Men come to choose
56
First From bodily Pains Secondly From wrong De sires arising from wrong Judgment
57
Our Judgment of present Good or Evil always
58
right
59
From a wrong Judgment of what makes a necessary
60
Men mult think and know for themselves
68
Men arc differently furnished with these according
74
part of their Happiness
79
2J In the reception of simple Ideas the Understanding
86
CHAP VII
97
Sict
103
Secondary Qualities twofold first immediately per
113
Perception the Inlet of Knowledge
120
Contemplation i Memory
121
3Attention Repetition Pleasure and Pain six Ideas t5 Ideas fade in the Memory
122
Constantly repeated Ideas can scarce be lost
123
7 remembering the Mind is often active
124
CHAP XI
125
Of Discerning
127
No Knowledge wnhout it 2 The difference of V and Judgment 3 Clearness alone hinders onsusion 4 Comparing 5 Brutes compare but impersectly
129
Compounding 7 Brutes compound but little
130
Naming 9 Abstraction
131
Brutes abstract not 12 13 Idiots and Madmen
133
Method
134
These are the Beginnings of Human Knowledge 16 Appeal to Experience 17 Dark Room
135
Modes of Taste
148
The Revolutions of the Sun and Moon the properest
163
283I Eternity
169
Their Parts inseparable
181
CHAP XVII
188
Why some Modes have and others have not Names
206
CHAP XIX
207
Sect 1 j Sensation Remembrance Contemplation
209
CHAP XX
210
Pleasure and Pain simple Ideas 2 Good and Evil what 3 Our Passions moved by Good and EviL 4 Love
211
Hatred
212
Desire
253
j 62 A more particular Account of wrong Judgments 63 In comparing present and future
258
Causes of this
259
Recapitulation
270
CHAP V
v
CHAP XII
xii
CHAP XIII
xiii
CHAP XVI
xvi
Made by the Mind out of simple ones
1
Made voluntarily
2
Are either Modes Substances or relation
3
Modes
4
Simple and mixed Modes
5
7
7
We have no Idea of infinite Space
8
Hope
9
o Fear 11 Despair
11
Anger
12
Envy
13
What Passions all Men have
14
Upon this Hypothesis the thoughts of a sleeping
15
Shame
17
The Instances to mow how our Ideas of the Passioh
18
Obj Innate Principles may be corrupted answered
20
But to the Agent or
21
AU these Ideas from Sensation and Reflection
22
25 26 27 The Will determined by something without
25
CHAP XXI
34
The greatest positive Good determines not the Will but Uneasiness
35
Because the removal of Uneasiness is the first step to Happiness
36
Because Uneasiness alone is present
37
Because all who allow the Joys of Heaven possible pursue them not but a great Uneasiness is never neglected
38
Desire accompanies all Uneasiness
39
The most pressing Uneasiness naturally determines the Will
40
All desire Happiness
41
Happiness what
42
What Good is desired what
43
Of Duration
44
Of Power
45
Due consideration raises Desire
46
The Power to suspend the Prosecution of any Desire makes way for Consideration
47
To be determined by our own Judgment is no Restraint to Liberty
48
The freest Agents are so determined
49
In considering Consequences of Actions
66
Causes of this
67
Wrong Judgment of what is necessary to our Happi ness
68
We can change the Agreeableness or Disagreeablenesj
69
Sect
75
Confusion without reference to Names hardly con
89
Of Number
94
CHAP XXX
95
in things
96
Secondly Modes not false 18 Thirdly Ideas of Substances when false
116
Truth or Falsehood always supposes Affirmation or Negation
117
Ideas in themselves never true nor false 2I But are false First When judged agreeable to ano ther Mans Idea without being so 22 Secondly When judg...
118
Ideas when false
119
More properly to be called right or wrong 27 Conclusion CHAP XXXIII
120
Something unreasonable in most Men 2 Not wholly from Selflove 3 Nor from Education 4 A Degree of Madness
121
Sect
127
CHAP II
132
CHAP IV
149
Simple Ideas why undesinable farther explained
155
Sect
223
CHAP II
268
CHAP IX
275
Sect
277
No moral Principles so clear and so generally received
1
SlCT
2
Power includes Relatives
3
But not so easy
4
Not without precedent Doubt
5
j From a wrong connection of Ideas 6 This connection how made
6
That Men know them when they come to the
7
Hence the Mistake ex frtcogmtis etgrtconcefjit
8
A great Cause of Errors
9
1012 Instances
10
What Use these general Maxims have
11
This Train the Measure of other Successions
12
Why Time cures some Disorders in the Mind which Reason cannot
13
1416 Farther Instances of the Effects of the Association
14
of Ideas
15
1618 Instance in
16
If the Idea of God be not innate no other can be sup
17
Observable in different Sects
18
r8 Consequences of Words and Consequences of Ideas
19
tg Little Use ofthese Maxims in Proofs where we hae clear and distinct Ideas
32
C HAP I
42
Being nothing but the joining or separating Ideas with
59
Principles not innate because of little Use or little Cer
63
lj Real and nominal Essence
64
to As far as any such Coexistence can be known so
68
71 72 73 Preference of Vice to Virtue a manifest wrong Judgment
70
What is requisite sor our Knowledge of Substances
75
Their Use dangerous where our Ideas are confused CHAP VIII
97
As First Identical Propositions 4 Secondly When a part of any complex Idea is predt cated of the whole 5 As part of the Definition of the defined
101
InstanceMan and Palfry
102
For this teaches but the Signification of Words
103
But no real Knowledge
104
Our Idea of a most perfect Being not the sole Proof
109
to Incogitative Being cannot produce a cogitative
117
perceiving
149
Sect
188
Man sitted to sorm articulate Sound 2 To make them Signs of Ideas
189
OF THE CONDUCT OF THE UNDERSTATING
227

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - For if we will reflect on our own ways of thinking, we shall find that sometimes the mind perceives the agreement or disagreement of two ideas immediately by themselves, without the intervention of any other: and this, I think, we may call 'intuitive knowledge.
Page 72 - I would be understood to mean, that notice which the mind takes of its own operations, and the manner of them, by reason whereof there come to be ideas of these operations in the understanding.
Page 105 - ... some motion must be thence continued by our nerves or animal spirits, by some parts of our bodies, to the brain or the seat of sensation, there to produce in our minds the particular ideas we have of them.
Page 200 - ... a new set of discoveries communicated by God immediately; which reason vouches the truth of, by the testimony and proofs it gives that they come from God. So that he that takes away reason to make way for revelation, puts out the light of both, and does muchwhat the same as if he would persuade a man to put out his eyes, the better to receive the remote light of an invisible star by a telescope.
Page 18 - From all which it is evident, that the extent of our knowledge comes not only short of the reality of things, but even of the extent of our own ideas.
Page 8 - This part of knowledge is irresistible, and like bright sunshine forces itself immediately to be perceived, as soon as ever the mind turns its view that way; and leaves no room for hesitation, doubt, or examination, but the mind is presently filled with the clear light of it. It is on this intuition that depends all the certainty and evidence of all our knowledge...
Page 72 - ... got; which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas which could not be had from things without; and such are perception, thinking, doubting, believing, reasoning...
Page 88 - When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas.
Page 247 - ... harangues and popular addresses, they are certainly, in all discourses that pretend to inform or instruct, wholly to be avoided ; and, where truth and knowledge are concerned, cannot but be thought a great fault either of the language or person 'that makes use of them.
Page 187 - I think it may not be amiss to take notice, that, however faith be opposed to reason, faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind ; which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to any thing but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it. He that believes without having any reason for believing, may be in love with his own fancies ; but neither seeks truth as he ought, nor pays the obedience due to his Maker...

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