Models of Democracy

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Stanford University Press, 2006 - Political Science - 338 pages
9 Reviews
In a succinct and far-reaching analysis, David Held provides an introduction to major theories of democracy from classical Greece to the present, along with a critical discussion of what democracy should mean today.

This new edition has been extensively revised and updated to take into account significant transformations in world politics. A new chapter on deliberative democracy has been added, which focuses on how citizen participation can be increased in politics, and how that participation can become more informed.

Like its predecessor, the third edition of Models of Democracy combines lucid exposition and clarity of expression with careful scholarship and originality, making it highly attractive to students and experts in the field. The third edition will prove essential reading for all those interested in politics, political theory, and political philosophy.

Praise for the second edition:

“Held’s new book on models of democracy is itself a model of its kind—a meticulously edited, easily accessible, and clearly signposted critical analysis of theories of democracy from classical antiquity to the present day.”—Ethics

“In this timely and thought-provoking study, Held provides a critical reassessment of major theories of democracy from ancient Greece to the present, along with his own prescription for revitalizing contemporary democratic politics. . . . This volume should be read and pondered by anyone interested in the future of democracy.”—The Annals

  

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Review: Models of Democracy

User Review  - Linnéa - Goodreads

Easy to understand, not very complicated even though it could have been. Held have a clear language and has structured the book in a very satisfying way. Read full review

Review: Models of Democracy

User Review  - Kathleen - Goodreads

great intro to various democratic theories. wonderful for an undergraduate course. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
CLASSIC MODELS
9
Classical Democracy Athens
11
Political ideals and aims
13
Institutional features
17
The exclusivity of ancient democracy
19
The critics
23
model I
27
Group politics governments and power
160
Politics consensus and the distribution of power
165
Democracy corporate capitalism and the state
169
Accumulation legitimation and the restricted sphere of the political
172
model VI
173
The changing form of representative institutions
179
From Postwar Stability to Political Crisis The Polarization of Political Ideals
185
A legitimate democratic order or a repressive regime?
187

Republicanism Liberty SelfGovernment and the Active Citizen
29
The reforging of republicanism
32
Republicanism elective government and popular sovereignty
36
From civic life to civic glory
40
The republic and the general will
43
model IIa
44
model IIb
48
The public and the private
49
The Development of Liberal Democracy For and Against the State
56
Power and sovereignty
60
Citizenship and the constitutional state
62
Separation of powers
65
The problem of factions
70
Accountability and markets
75
model IIIa
78
Liberty and the development of democracy
79
The dangers of despotic power and an overgrown state
81
Representative government
84
The subordination of women
88
Competing conceptions of the ends of government
91
model IIIb
92
Direct Democracy and the End of Politics
96
History as evolution and the development of capitalism
98
Two theories of the state
103
The end of politics
108
Competing conceptions of Marxism
116
model IV
120
VARIANTS FROM THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
123
Competitive Elitism and the Technocratic Vision
125
Classes power and conflict
126
Bureaucracy parliaments and nationstates
129
Competitive elitist democracy
134
Liberal democracy at the crossroads
138
The last vestige of democracy?
141
Democracy capitalism and socialism
144
Classical v modern democracy
146
A technocratic vision
152
model V
157
Pluralism Corporate Capitalism and the State
158
Overloaded state or legitimation crisis?
190
an assessment
196
Law liberty and democracy
201
model VII
207
Participation liberty and democracy
209
model VIII
215
Democracy after Soviet Communism
217
The historical backdrop
218
The triumph of economic and political liberalism?
220
The renewed necessity of Marxism and democracy from below?
225
Deliberative Democracy and the Defence of the Public Realm
231
Reason and participation
232
The limits of democratic theory
234
The aims of deliberative democracy
237
What is sound public reasoning? Impartialism and its critics
238
Institutions of deliberative democracy
246
Value pluralism and democracy
252
model IX
253
WHAT SHOULD DEMOCRACY MEAN TODAY?
257
Democratic Autonomy
259
The appeal of democracy
260
The principle of autonomy
262
Enacting the principle
267
The heritage of classic and twentiethcentury democratic theory
271
a doublesided process
275
compatibilities and incompatibilities
281
model Xa
282
Democracy the NationState and the Global System
290
Democratic legitimacy and borders
291
old and new
292
Sovereignty autonomy and disjunctures
294
the cosmopolitan model
304
model Xb
308
A Utopian project?
309
Acknowledgements
312
Bibliography
313
Index
328
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About the author (2006)

David Held is Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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