The Rise of the Public in Enlightenment Europe

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 6, 2001 - History - 284 pages
2 Reviews
James Melton's lucid and accessible study examines the rise of 'the public' in eighteenth-century Europe. A work of comparative synthesis focusing on England, France, and the German-speaking territories, this is the first book-length, critical reassessment of what the philosopher JÜrgen Habermas called the 'bourgeois public sphere' of the eighteenth century. Topics include the growing importance of public opinion in political life, transformations of the literary public realm, eighteenth-century authorship, theatre publics, and new practices of sociability as they developed in salons, coffeehouses, taverns and Masonic lodges.
  

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An excellent synthesis of the literature. Read full review

Contents

The peculiarities of the English
19
Politics and the press
27
Radicalism and extraparliamentary politics after 1760
33
Ambiguities of the political public sphere
39
Opacity and transparency French political culture in the eighteenth century
45
Jansenism and the emergence of an oppositional public sphere
48
The politics of publicity
55
Secrecy and its discontents
61
Vienna
183
Being sociable
195
Women in public enlightenment salons
197
The rise of the salon
199
Women and sociability in Enlightenment thought
202
Salon culture in eighteenthcentury Paris
205
The salon in eighteenthcentury England
211
Salons of Vienna and Berlin
215

Readers writers and spectators
79
Reading publics transformations of the literary public sphere
81
The reading revolution
86
Periodicals novels and the literary public sphere
92
The rise of the lending library
104
The public and its problems
110
Writing publics eighteenthcentury authorship
123
The status of the author in England France and Germany
124
the rise of copyright
137
Women and authorship
148
From courts to consumers theater publics
160
The stage legitimated
162
The theater and the court
166
London
171
Paris
177
Drinking in public taverns and coffeehouses
226
Alcohol and sociability
227
the case of London
229
from cabaret to cafe
235
The political culture of coffee
240
Coffee capitalism and the world of learning
244
Coffeehouse sociability
247
Freemasonry toward civil society
252
The rise of freemasonry
254
Inclusion and exclusion
257
Freemasonry and politics
262
Conclusion
273
Index
277
Copyright

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