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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel....  
" Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ... - Page 335
edited by - 1804
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King Henry VIII. Coriolanus

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, John Bell - 1788
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? 640 Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour : O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. 650 Crom. I am glad, your...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - Drama - 1803
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour : O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your grace...
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The plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 6

William Shakespeare, Nicholas Rowe, Edmond Malone, Isaac Reed - Drama - 1804
...wonder, A great man should decline? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom, How does your grace? Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your grace...
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Shakespeare's King Henry the eighth, a historical play, revised by J.P ...

William Shakespeare - 1804
...Nay, an you weep, I 'm fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truely happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I...within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still apd quiet conscience. . \ Crom, I'm glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope,...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ...

William Shakespeare - 1805
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. . How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your grace...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1805
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace? Wol. ' Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your grace...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 9

William Shakespeare, Manley Wood - 1806
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crow;. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour : O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Croat. I am glad, your...
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The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Isaac Reed - Drama - 1807
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...load would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your grace...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, with Explanatory Notes ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, Samuel Ayscough, Nicholas Rowe - History - 1807
...[in A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur' I humbly thank his grace;andfrom these shoulder ; I rather choose To wrong the dead, to wrong myself, and you, Than I will wrong such honourab burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. 1 am glad your grace...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 11

William Shakespeare, Joseph Dennie, Isaac Reed, George Steevens, Samuel Johnson - Drama - 1808
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, 'Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad, your...
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