Domestic Architecture of the American Colonies and of the Early Republic (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Scribner's Sons, 1922 - Architecture, Colonial - 314 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - The wilderness masters the colonist. It finds him a European in dress, industries, tools, modes of travel, and thought. It takes him from the railroad car and puts him in the birch canoe. It strips off the garments of civilization and arrays him in the hunting shirt and the moccasin. It puts him in the log cabin of the Cherokee and Iroquois and runs an Indian palisade around him. Before long he has gone to planting Indian corn and plowing with a sharp stick; he shouts the war cry and takes the scalp...
Page 4 - In foul weather, we shifted into an old rotten tent ; for we had few better; and this came by way of adventure for new.
Page 30 - ... that it was for the warmth of his house, and the charge was little, being but clapboards nailed to the wall in the form of wainscot.
Page 5 - And thus these poore servants of Christ provide shelter for themselves, their wives and little ones, keeping off the short showers from their lodgings, but the long raines penetrate through to their great disturbance in the night season.
Page 8 - Further, the Lord hath been pleased to turn all the wigwams, huts, and hovels the English dwelt in at their first coming, into orderly, fair, and well-built houses, well furnished many of them...
Page xvii - London, though handsomer than Paris, is not so handsome as Philadelphia. Their architecture is in the most wretched style I ever saw, not meaning to except America, where it is bad, nor even Virginia, where it is worse than in any other part of America which I have seen.
Page 11 - You may let the chimnyes be all the breadth of the howse, if you thinke good ; the 2 lower dores to be in the middle of the howse, one opposite to the other. Be sure that all the dorewaies in every place be soe high that any man may goe vpright vnder. The staiers I thinke had best be placed close by the dore. It makes noe great matter though there be noe particion vpon the first flore ; if there be, make one biger then the other. For windowes, let them not be over large in any roome...
Page 11 - I would have wood chimnyes at each end, the frames of the chimnyes to be stronger then ordinary, to beare good heavy load of clay for security against fire. You may let the chimnyes be all the breadth of the howse if you thinke good ; the 2 lower dores to be in the middle of the howse, one opposite to the other. Be sure that all the dorewaies in every place be soe high that any...
Page 12 - ... soe tenented in at the ends; I leave it to you and the Carpenters. In this story over the first I would have a particion, whether in the middest or over the particion vnder I leave it; In the garrett noe particion, but let there be one or two lucome windowes, if two, both on one side.
Page 24 - ... present day to make a hard surface on the mortar, broken glass was used. This glass appears like that of common junk bottles, broken into pieces of about half an inch diameter, the sharp corners of which penetrate the cement in such a manner, that this great lapse of years has had no perceptible effect upon them. The figures 1680 were impressed into the rough-cast to show the year of its erection, and are now perfectly legible. This surface was also variegated with ornamental squares, diamonds,...

Bibliographic information