Deadly Medicine: Indians and Alcohol in Early America

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Cornell University Press, 1997 - History - 268 pages
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Alcohol abuse has killed and impoverished American Indians since the seventeenth century, when European settlers began trading rum for furs. In the first book to probe the origins of this ongoing social crisis, Peter C. Mancall explores the liquor trade's devastating impact on the Indian communities of colonial America. The author follows the trail of rum from the West Indian producers to the colonial distributors and on to the Indian consumers in the eastern woodlands. To discover why Indians participated in the trade and why they experienced such a powerful desire for alcohol, he addresses current medical views on alcoholism and reexamines the colonial era as a time when Indians were forming new strategies for survival in a world that had been radically changed. Finally, Mancall compares Indian drinking in New France and New Spain with that in the British colonies. Forever shattering the stereotype of the drunken Indian, Mancall offers a powerful indictment of English participation in the liquor trade and a new awareness of the trade's tragic cost for the American Indians.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER SEVEN The British Imperial Moment 17631775
155
APPENDIX II
183
Notes
193
A Note on Sources
245
Index
261
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About the author (1997)

Peter C. Mancall is professor of history and anthropology at the University of Southern California and director of the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute. He is author of "Hakluyt's Promise: An Elizabethan's Obsession for an English America" and editor of "Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery: An Anthology".

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