Agreement in Natural Language: Approaches, Theories, Descriptions

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Michael Barlow, Charles Albert Ferguson
Center for the Study of Language (CSLI), Jan 1, 1988 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 355 pages
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Although grammatical agreement or concord is widespread in human languages, linguistic theorists have generally treated agreement phenomena as secondary or even marginal. All the papers in this volume, however, take agreement phenomena seriously, as presenting either a general issue in theory construction or a descriptive problem in particular types of languages. The theoretical perspectives range from purportedly theory-neutral typological frameworks to assumptions about the validity of one or another current formal model. Further, the degree of generality ranges from a universalist nature-of-human-language agenda to concern with one or another aspect of grammatical agreement or with agreement in a single language or language group.
  

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Contents

A Partial
23
Target Problems
39
On the Function of Agreement
55
Toward a Unified Theory of Agreement
67
Markedness and Morphological Features
80
Agreement and Markednessthe Empirical Fit
94
Agreement in Arabic
107
An Agreement Typology and the Domain Problem
129
Extensions of BrotherinLaw Agreement
219
Conclusion
234
VerbCoded Constructions
245
Agreement with Gaps
251
Explanation
281
Noun Phrase Internal
287
Prequantifiers and Discontinuous Case Agreement
295
Case Marking on Postposed Modifiers
301

Conclusion
155
Agreement Case Marking and Possession
171
Predicate Complements in Lithuanian
185
On the Complementarity
201
Conclusion
217
Noun Classes
305
Noun Classes and Agreement
323
Language Index
343
Subject Index
349
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Dr. Alejandro Terrazas is president of VRSciences, a startup company developing VR therapies for the treatment of mental disorders including addiction and age-related memory impairments. The company also conducts research and develops software for simulation and training in virtual urban environments. Alex is an expert in functional brain imaging, neurophysiology and the brain mechanisms of navigation and memory formation in virtual environments. He previously held the position of associate director of the Machine Interface Network Design (MIND) Lab at Michigan State University where he oversaw research in telepresence, virtual environments, and 3D graphics. Dr. Terrazas received his Ph.D. in Cognition and Neural Systems from the University of Arizona.

John Ostuni graduated from Rutgers University with a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering. Since that time, he has worked at the National Institutes of Health where he is currently a senior staff scientist in the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center. He has taught various courses in Java and C++, and his current interests are medical image processing and converting research-based software into clinical applications. He currently resides in Maryland with his wife Sandra and his two sons Steven and Anthony.

Dr. Michael Barlow (he prefers simply to be called Spike) is the founding director of the Virtual Environment and Simulation Laboratory (VESL) and a senior lecturer within the School of Computer Science at the University of New South Wales, ADFA (Australian Defence Force Academy).

For the past 15 years, Spike has been an active researcher in the area of media and speech recognition in particular, including a stint of two years inJapan's NTT (Nippon Telegraph and Telephone) Human Interface Laboratories working on Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition. His other major research areas include virtual environments for scientific visualization and education and multi-agent systems for simulation and modeling.

Spike has taught Java at the university level for several years. He currently teaches courses on OO programming, data structures, multimedia, and virtual environments.

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