Britain in the Middle Ages: an archaeological history

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HarperPress, Oct 1, 2006 - History - 330 pages
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Drawing upon on a wealth of knowledge, discovery, research, and technical advances, this historical book dispels the common misconception of the "Dark Ages" as an era of chaos and violence. Redefining everything from the role of the Vikings to the supposed rigidity of the feudal system, this eminent archaeologist demolishes many of the myths about medieval Britain. Readers will learn that the Middle Ages were far from static; the two centuries following the Black Death epidemic of 1348, were a time of diversity, transition, and growth. Engaging and scholarly, this book reintroduces the reader to an era that gave birth to the modern world.

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Review: Britain in the Middle Ages: An Archaeological History

User Review  - Juan - Goodreads

Pryor keeps making the past alive with his talent for writing and his vast knowledge of archaeology. Read full review

Review: Britain in the Middle Ages: An Archaeological History

User Review  - John Scott - Goodreads

My first Archaeology book and enjoyed it enough that I have grabbed a few more by the good Francis Pryor to read at a later date. Read full review

Contents

On Britons Saxons and Vikings
19
Enter the Vikings
68
Rural Life in Late Saxon Times
108
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Dr Francis Pryor has spent thirty years studying the prehistory of the Fens. He has excavated sites as diverse as Bronze Age farms, field systems and entire Iron Age villages. From 1980 he turned his attention to pre-Roman religion and has excavated barrows, āhengesā, and a large ceremonial centre dating to 3800BC. In 1987, with his wife Maisie Taylor, he set up the Fenland Archaeological Trust. He appears frequently on TVās Time Team and is the author of Seahenge, Britain B.C. and Britain A.D.

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