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Books Books 1 - 10 of 153 on Religion, therefore, as I now ask you arbitrarily to take it, shall mean for us the....  
" Religion, therefore, as I now ask you arbitrarily to take it, shall mean for us the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual men in their solitude, so far as they apprehend themselves to stand in relation to whatever they may consider the divine. "
The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature - Page 31
by William James - 1902 - 526 pages
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Annual Register

History - 1903
...Experience (Longmans) formed the subject of his course of Gifford lectures, in which he defines religion as "the feelings, acts and experiences of individual...themselves to stand in relation to whatever they may call divine." He claims that the advance in the liberal interpretation of Christianity which has marked...
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The Critical Review of Theological & Philosophical Literature, Volume 12

Stewart Dingwall Fordyce Salmond - Theology - 1902
...introduction, and of the definition of the field itself. Religion is defined, for the present purpose, as " the feelings, acts and experiences of individual men...relation to whatever they may consider the divine " (p. 31). This purely empiricist definition was necessitated by the manner of approach, and must not...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 234

Eliakim Littell, Robert S. Littell - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1902
...one religion; he deliberately puts both theology and ecclesiasticism on one side, and considers only "the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...relation to whatever they may consider the divine." If we look, he says, on man's whole mental life as it stands, the part of it of which rationalism can...
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God and the Individual

Thomas Banks Strong - Individualism - 1903 - 112 pages
...and taken hold of one side in it exclusively, he easily reaches his definition of religion (p. 31), "the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...relation to whatever they may consider the divine." And in regard to this last phrase, " the divine," he makes a further definition, " arbitrarily, if...
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The Church quarterly review, Volume 56

Religion - 1903
...religion as an experience, a life ; or, as it is described by Dr. James (p. 31), a collection of ' feelings, acts, and experiences of individual men...relation to whatever they may consider the divine.' And the whole subject, Psychology of Religion, ' has for its work to carry the well-established methods...
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The Monist, Volume 13

Philosophy - 1903
...second lecture, the topic to be studied is circumscribed. Religion is defined arbitrarily to mean " the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...to stand in relation to whatever they may consider divine." What this "divine " is remains in each case for interpretation, as for example in atheistic...
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The Annual Register, Volume 144

Edmund Burke - History - 1903
...Experience (Longmans) formed the subject of his course of Gifford lectures, in which he defines religion as "the feelings, acts and experiences of individual...themselves to stand in relation to whatever they may call divine." He claims that the advance in the liberal interpretation of Christianity which has marked...
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The Salvation army and the public: a religious, social, and financial study

John Manson - Business & Economics - 1906 - 376 pages
...James's special study. For the purposes of that study " religion " is carefully denned by him as " the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...relation to whatever they may consider the divine." The Salvation Army, however, is a permanently established revival agency, and any conversions which...
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Pathological Aspects of Religions

Josiah Morse - Psychology, Pathological - 1906 - 264 pages
...infinity, and guides his conduct. ' ' J James : ' ' Religion means, for the purpose of these lectures, the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...relation to whatever they may consider the divine." 2 The phrase, ' ' in their solitude, ' ' limits the definition to the passive, subjective type of individuals,...
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Pathological aspects of religions

Josiah Morse - Psychology, Pathological - 1906 - 264 pages
...infinity, and guides his conduct. ' ' 1 James : ' ' Religion means, for the purpose of these lectures, the feelings, acts, and experiences of individual...stand in relation to whatever they may consider the divine."2 The phrase, "in their solitude," limits the definition to the passive, subjective type of...
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