The Loyalists of America and Their Times: From 1620 to 1816, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. Briggs, 1880 - American loyalists
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Review: The Loyalists of America and Their Times - Volume I (Dodo Press)

User Review  - Steve Toms - Goodreads

I could not finish this book. Mr Ryerson spent too much time in the first half of the book attempting to debunk other historians' work. The book wasn't so much about the Loyalists as it was about him trying to persuade the reader that his version of history was the correct one. Read full review

Contents

Sir Henry Clinton goes South besieges and takes Charleston 84
35
Washingtons despondency without French aid in a note
41
Plan of the siege of York Town
44
The war party and corrupt administration at length defeated in the House
50
Two most difficult questions of the treatyThe fishing grounds of Newfound
56
It was at length agreed that the Congress should recommend to the several
58
Deplorable condition of the Loyalists during the war utter abandonment
64
The most important question of the Loyalists _
67
CHAPTER XXXIIL
72
The employment of the Indians in every respect disadvantageous to England
76
Efforts of General Burgoyne to restrain the Indians who were an incumbrance
82
In the House of Commons Mr Wilberforce Lord North Lord Mulgrave
85
Description of Wyoming
88
Both Congress and the English sought the alliance and cooperation of
97
CHAPTER XXXV
99
Further examples of retaliation socalled inflicted upon the Indians
106
Dr Franklins fictions on the massacre and scalping of the whites by Indians
115
Situation and treatment of the Loyalists during the War 123138
123
Their position nnd character stated by Mr Hildreth abused by mobs
125
Massachusetts
131
CHAPTER XXXVII
139
APPENDIX B TO CHAPTER XXXVII
154
In the House of Lords Lords Walsingham TownsenJ Stormont Sackville
163
CHAPTER XXXIX
183
Brief sketches of some individual Loyalists in the British Pro
190
Samuel Anderson 2 Rev John Bethune 8 Doaneafive brothers
204
Colonel Joseph Robinson his adventures and settlement by the late lion
213
Patriotic feeling and early settlement of Prince Edward County and neighbor
219
Colonel Samuel Ryerse his adventures settlement and character in
228
Legislation progress trade customhouses 813
314
The alleged and real causes of the war the Democratic party in the United
318
The Henry Plot affair conduct of President Madison in respect to
331
CHAPTER L
337
Preparations in Upper Canada for selfdefence 841
342
First Invasion of Upper Canada in the Western District by Gen
351
Particulars of Tecumsehs personal history and death in a note 857
358
Second Invasion or Utpeb Canada at Queenston 365371
365
Third American Invasion op Canada 372379
372
Three armies altogether of 10000 men defeated by less than 1000 Canadian
378
BATTLE OF CHATEAUGUAY
381
General Proctors slender force at Detroit 884
385
The American plan of campaign to invade and take Canada in 1813 890
391
American army retreats in great disorder towards Fort George 896
397
Second unsuccessful attempt of Commodore Sir James Yeo on Sacketts
401
In consequence of the loss of the fleet on Lake Erie the British army in pos
407
General Hampton with 5000 men defeated by the skill and courage
413
The campaign of the season terminated in Lower Canada the Canadian
421
Proclamation issued by General Drummond deprecating this savage mode
425
The estimate of Mr Christie the Canadian historian of the character
431
American residents allowed twenty days to leave the Province 310
432
General Rial retires to Fort George pursued by General Brown pillage
437
American army retreats to Fort Erie pursued by General Drummond
443
First settlement of Loyalists in Nova Scotia by a gentleman of that Pro
454
CHAPTER LIX
461
CHAPTER LX
469
Elements of their affectionate attachment to England 125
483
Spain joins France against England in 1779 28
488

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 178 - It is agreed that creditors on either side shall meet with no lawful impediment to the recovery of the full value in sterling money, of all bona fide debts heretofore contracted.
Page 217 - THAT AND A' THAT" Is there, for honest Poverty, That hangs his head, and a' that! The coward slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a
Page 150 - Such a dearth of public spirit and such want of virtue, such stock-jobbing and fertility in all the low arts to obtain advantages of one kind or another in this great change of military arrangement I never saw before, and pray God's mercy that I may never be witness to again.
Page 6 - ... the king and parliament of Great Britain will not impose any duty, tax, or assessment whatever, payable in any of His Majesty's colonies, provinces and plantations in North America or the West Indies ; except only such duties as it may be expedient to impose for the regulation of commerce...
Page 49 - That the House would consider as enemies to his majesty and the country all those who should advise, or by any means attempt, the further prosecution of offensive war on the Continent of North America.
Page 119 - They have driven us out of our country by taking part in your quarrel. We expect the great King will give us another country, that our children may live after us, and be his friends and children as we are. Say this for us to the great King. To enforce it, we give this belt. A great white belt with blue tassels.
Page 29 - ... an assembly, a concert, a dinner, or supper, that will cost three or four hundred pounds, will not only take men off from acting in this business, but even from thinking of it, while a great part of the officers of our army, from absolute necessity, are quitting the service, and the more virtuous few, rather than do this, are sinking by sure degrees into beggary and want.
Page 351 - ... the stormy period of the revolution. That liberty which has raised us to an elevated rank among the nations of the world; and which...
Page 29 - ... party disputes and personal quarrels are the great business of the day...

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