Scribner's Magazine, Volume 40 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Charles Scribners Sons, 1906
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Contents

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Page 417 - How oft do they with golden pinions cleave The flitting skies like flying pursuivant, Against foul fiends to aid us militant! They for us fight, they watch and duly ward, And their bright squadrons round about us plant; And all for love, and nothing for reward: O why should Heavenly God to men have such regard ? LONDON: APPROVED SCHOOL BOOKS.
Page 406 - Waft, waft, ye winds, his story, And you, ye waters, roll, Till, like a sea of glory, It spreads from pole to pole; Till...
Page 20 - I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes.
Page 420 - God shall charge His angel legions Watch and ward o'er thee to keep : Though thou walk through hostile regions, Though in desert wilds thou sleep.
Page 400 - At this time the buffalo occupy but a very limited space, principally along the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains, sometimes extending at their southern extremity to a considerable distance into the plains between the Platte and Arkansas rivers, and along the eastern frontier of New Mexico as far south as Texas.
Page 644 - Not by appointment do we meet delight And joy; they heed not our expectancy; But round some corner in the streets of life They on a sudden clasp us with a smile.
Page 752 - They say, he is already in the forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him ; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say, many young gentlemen flock to him every day ; and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
Page 527 - Lives of great men all remind us We should make our lives sublime And departing leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time.
Page 483 - Not fortune's worshipper, nor fashion's fool, Not lucre's madman, nor ambition's tool, Not proud, nor servile; be one poet's praise, That, if he pleased, he pleased by manly ways : That flattery, even to kings, he held a shame, And thought a lie in verse or prose the same.
Page 421 - Since, with pure and firm affection, Thou on GOD hast set thy love, With the wings of his protection He will shield thee from above.

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