The Pocket magazine of classic and polite literature. [Continued as] The Pocket magazine (Google eBook)

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1829
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Page 253 - DUKE'S PALACE. [Enter DUKE, CURIO, LORDS; MUSICIANS attending.] DUKE. If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die. That strain again; it had a dying fall; O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour. Enough; no more; 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Page 241 - Is it so?" reflecting on the alliance which had placed the Stewart family on the throne; "then God's will be done. It came with a lass, and it will go with a lass.
Page 216 - And it came to pass, that at midnight the LORD smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh that sat on his throne unto the firstborn of the captive that was in the dungeon ; and all the firstborn of cattle.
Page 261 - The sun had long since, in the lap Of Thetis, taken out his nap, And, like a lobster boil'd, the morn From black to red began to turn...
Page 283 - Scholars only this immense And glorious Work of fine intelligence! Give all thou canst ; high Heaven rejects the lore Of nicely-calculated less or more ; So deemed the man who fashioned for the sense These lofty pillars, spread that branching roof Self-poised, and scooped into ten thousand cells, Where light and shade repose, where music dwells Lingering and wandering on as loth to die; Like thoughts whose very sweetness yieldeth proof That they were born for immortality.
Page 65 - Those who approach the study of this interesting subject with unbiassed minds will readily perceive that there must have existed an early period of lawlessness, in which it was with women as with other kinds of property, " that he should take who had the power, and he should keep who can"; that wives were first obtained by force, then by theft, and later by trade and bargain.
Page 214 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 97 - The Jolly Beggars, for humorous description and nice discrimination of character, is inferior to no poem of the same length in the whole range of English poetry. The scene indeed is laid in the very lowest department of low life, the actors being a set of strolling vagrants, met to carouse, and barter their rags and plunder for liquor in a hedge alehouse.
Page 145 - Tower Menagerie; comprising the Natural History of the Animals contained in that Establishment, with Anecdotes of their Characters and History. Illustrated by Portraits of each, taken from life, by William Harvey, [and engraved on Wood by Branston and Wright.
Page 228 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.

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