Shakespeare's Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, publishers, 1879 - Juliet (Fictitious character) - 222 pages
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Page 89 - For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night, Whiter than new snow on a raven's back. Come, gentle night: come, loving, black-brow'd night Give me my Romeo: and when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Page 69 - O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities : For nought so vile that on the earth doth live, But to the earth some special good doth give...
Page 63 - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
Page 65 - Thou mayst prove false: at lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo ! If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully: Or if thou think'st I am too quickly won, I'll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo; but else, not for the world. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond; And therefore thou mayst think my 'haviour light: But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
Page 66 - Do not swear at all; Or, if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self, Which is the god of my idolatry, And I'll believe thee.
Page 89 - Phoebus' lodging; such a waggoner As Phaethon would whip you to the west, And bring in cloudy night immediately. Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night! That runaway's eyes may wink, and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen! Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night. Come...
Page 64 - What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name, And for thy. name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself.
Page 53 - Her wagon-spokes made of long spinners' legs, The cover, of the wings of grasshoppers, The traces, of the smallest spider's web, The collars, of the moonshine's watery beams...
Page 54 - a lies asleep, Then dreams he of another benefice : Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep ; and then anon Drums in his ear; at which he starts, and wakes; And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again.
Page 63 - tis not to me she speaks: Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.

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Shakespeare's tragedy of Romeo & Juliet - Catálogo Acceder
Shakespeare's tragedy of Romeo & Juliet Biblioteca Miguel Cané. Autor: Shakespeare, William; Palabra clave: LITERATURA INGLESA-TEATRO ...
www.acceder.gov.ar/ es/ cd:Biblioteca_Miguel_Cane.13/ 2013882

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