What's Wrong with the World (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Oct 1, 2007 - Social Science - 232 pages
46 Reviews
British writer GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON (1874-1936) expounded prolifically about his wide-ranging philosophies-he is impossible to categorize as "liberal" or "conservative," for instance-across a wide variety of avenues: he was a literary critic, historian, playwright, novelist, columnist, and poet. This 1910 book is a unified work about all the broad array of worries that trouble the world, but it can be read in essaylike chunks. Discovering Chesterton's inimitable take on: . Wanted, an Unpractical Man . The Free Family . The Wildness of Domesticity . Oppression by Optimism . Wisdom and the Weather . The Unmilitary Suffragette . The Romance of Thrift . The Higher Anarchy . The Truth About Education . The Need for Narrowness . The Staleness of the New Schools . The Empire of the Insect An excellent introduction to the world of G.K. Chesteton, this is a volume as pertinent today as it was a century ago.
  

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Review: What's Wrong with the World

User Review  - Karina - Goodreads

I read this a very long time ago. Maybe it's time to read it again. This is freely available on Gutenberg.org. Read full review

Review: What's Wrong with the World

User Review  - Brett Sayles - Goodreads

A great book, but very dated. Chesterton spends a lot of time dealing with issues that we've passed by. Worth reading though. Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
3
IV
7
V
13
VI
19
VII
27
VIII
33
IX
37
XXX
127
XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XLI
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XLVIII
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L
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LV
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LVI
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Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 24 - The simple and obvious answer is "You can." A clock, being a piece of human construction, can be restored by the human finger to any figure or hour. In the same way society, being a piece of human construction, can be reconstructed upon any plan that has ever existed.
Page 9 - An act can only be successful or unsuccessful when it is over; if it is to begin, it must be, in the abstract, right or wrong. There is no such thing as backing a winner; for he cannot be a winner when he is backed. There is no such thing as fighting on the winning side; one fights to find out which is the winning side.
Page 9 - It is then necessary to drop one's daily agnosticism and attempt rerum cognoscere causas. If your aeroplane has a slight indisposition, a handy man may mend it. But, if it is seriously ill, it is all the more likely that some absent-minded old professor with wild white hair will have to be dragged out of a college or laboratory to analyze the evil. The more complicated the smash, the whiter-haired and more absent-minded will be the theorist who is needed to deal with it; and in some extreme cases,...

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About the author (2007)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England, in 1874. He began his education at St Paul's School, and later went on to study art at the Slade School, and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind's spiritual progress. After Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922, he wrote mainly on religious topics. Chesterton is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in "The Innocence of Father Brown." Chesterton died in 1936 at the age of 62.

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