The Military Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-1775, with Numerous Illustrative Notes to which is Added, a Supplement, Containing Official Papers on the Skirmishes at Lexington and Concord (Google eBook)

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A. Tomlinson, 1855 - Abercrombie's Ticonderoga Campaign, 1758 - 128 pages
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Page 115 - In the mean time, the provincial troops returned, to the number of about three or four hundred. We drew up on the Concord side of the bridge. The provincials came down upon us ; upon which we engaged and gave the first fire. This was the first engagement after the one at Lexington. A continued firing from both parties lasted through the whole day. I myself was wounded at the attack of the bridge, and am now treated with the greatest humanity, and taken all possible care of, by the provincials at...
Page 95 - Council of the city of London, that they may take such Order thereon, as they may think Proper. And we are Confident your fidelity will make such improvement of them, as shall convince all, who are not determined to be in everlasting blindness, that it is the united efforts of both Englands, that must save either.
Page 118 - ... have not yet detached us from our royal sovereign. We profess to be his loyal and dutiful subjects, and so hardly dealt with as we have been, are still ready, with our lives and fortunes, to defend his person, family, crown and dignity.
Page 109 - Bridge, about one mile from said meeting-house ; we then immediately went before them, and passed the bridge just before a party of them, to the number of about two hundred, arrived...
Page 115 - On a hill near the entrance of the town we saw another body of the provincials assembled. The light infantry companies were ordered up the hill to disperse them. On our approach they retreated towards Concord. The grenadiers continued the road under the hill towards the town. Six companies of light infantry were ordered down to take possession of the bridge, which the provincials retreated over: the company I commanded was one. Three companies of the above detachment went forward about two miles....
Page 105 - England, and of lawful age, do testify and declare that on the morning of the nineteenth of April, being on Lexington Common, as spectators, we saw a large body of regular troops marching up towards the Lexington company; and some of the regulars on horses, whom we took to be officers, fired a pistol or two on the Lexington company, which was then dispersing. These were the first guns that were fired ; and they were immediately followed by several volleys from the regulars, by which eight men belonging...
Page 104 - We further testify and say, that about five o'clock in the morning, we attended the beat of our drum, and were formed on the parade ; we were faced towards the regulars then marching up to us, and some of our company were coming to the parade, with their backs towards the troops, and others on the parade began to disperse, when the regulars fired on the company, before a gun was fired by any of our company on them...
Page 117 - Cambridge, with an apparent design to take or destroy the military and other stores, provided for the defence of this colony, and deposited at Concord that some inhabitants of the colony, on the night aforesaid, whilst travelling peaceably on the road, between Boston and Concord, were seized and greatly abused...
Page 107 - We, John Hoar, John Whithead, Abraham Garfield, Benjamin Munroe, Isaac Parker, William Hosmer, John Adams, Gregory Stone, all of Lincoln, in the County of Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay, all of lawful age, do testify and say, that on Wednesday last, we were assembled at Concord, in the morning of said day, in consequence of information received that a brigade of regular troops were on their march to the said town of Concord, who had killed six men at the town of Lexington. About an hour afterwards...
Page 118 - We cannot think that the honor, wisdom and valor of Britons will suffer them to be longer inactive spectators of measures in which they themselves are so deeply interested measures, pursued in opposition to the solemn protests of many noble lords, and expressed sense of conspicuous commoners, whose knowledge and virtue have long characterized them as some of the greatest men in the nation measures...

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