A Visit to Don Otavio: A Traveller's Tale from Mexico

Front Cover
Counterpoint, 1953 - Travel - 370 pages
18 Reviews
Before returning to the Old World after World War II, Sybille Bedford resolved to see something more of the New. I had a great longing to move, she said, to hear another language, eat new food, to be in a country with a long nasty history in the past and as little present history as possible. And so she set out for Mexico--and, incidentally, to write what Bruce Chatwin called the best travel book of the twentieth century, a book of marvels, to be read again and again and again.

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Review: A Visit to Don Otavio

User Review  - Jaggerjag - Goodreads

I first read this book years ago,and on reading it again I still enjoyed it. Certainly Sybille Bedford came from a privileged class, but I find so many of her 'complaints' about Mexico to be very ... Read full review

Review: A Visit to Don Otavio

User Review  - Raquel Martin - Goodreads

I'm reading this for the second time and it is still a delight. This is the best travel book I've ever read. Sybille Bedford is incredibly intelligent, extremely witty, and really GOT Mexico. Her ... Read full review

Contents

New York to Nuevo Laredo
3
Mesa del Norte Mesa Central Valle de Mexico
23
First Clash
34
Copyright

29 other sections not shown

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About the author (1953)

Sybille Bedford was born in 1911, in Charlottenburg, Germany, and was brought up in Italy, England, and France. in 1953, she made her literary debut with A Visit to Don Otavio, and has since published eight other books - including Jigsaw, A Legacy, A Favourite of the Gods, and A Compass Error, as well as classic accounts of criminal trials and other courtroom cases, and an acclaimed biography of her mentor Aldous Huxley. She was vice president of English PEN and one of Britain's nine Companions of Literature. Ms. Bedford lived in London where she passed away in February 2006.

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