Lessons of War as Taught by the Great Masters and Others: Selected and Arranged from the Various Operations of War (Google eBook)

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W.H. Allen & Company, 1870 - Military art and science - 565 pages
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Contents

Field artillery in the time of Charles I
13
Character needed for a great general
15
Wellingtons practice of daily study
16
A General experienced but unversed in strategy
17
Jomini as to prejudices respecting the principles of war
18
Vital questions of war to States
19
Pii PADS AIM AND PRINCIPLES 2326
23
What strategy teaches
24
What is requisite in the plan of a campaign
25
Section II
26
Its relation to depots of supplies
27
A frontier when suitable as a base or a line of defence 27 Direction of bases On a broad and rapid river An extended base 5 Fortified points and an e...
28
ab
30
PAR PAOE
32
PART IV
35
Section V
38
PAH TJLOt
43
Junction of two armies with separate lines of operation
44
Changing the line when necessary
50
Pai
52
Task for the inferior army of the Confederates
58
Theatre of war in Italy 1866
64
Concentration of artillery at Talavera
65
Fire of French artillery at Solferino
66
Increased offensive powers of artillery
67
Concentrated fire of divisional artillery at Friedland
68
Final direction of fire at Friedland Junction of the two grand batteries
69
Strategic front and front of operations
70
Advantages of concentrated fire Employment at Austerlitz and Lutzen
71
PA PAOE
73
Nature and number of pieces of ordnance
74
Transport of guns and mortars 76 Time for arming siege batteries
76
Opening fire from the batteries
77
Wellingtons detached troops on the day of Waterloo
79
Education of armies
81
Plan for concentration of the allied armies previous to Waterloo
85
The lance in the hands of a trained man
91
Political elements in the selection of a line for invasion
96
Defence of Portugal by the lines of Torres Vedras
102
Places of refuge intermediate between the frontier and the capital
109
Wellingtons opinion as to the difficulty of defending the Netherlands
115
ae Page 23 Conditions for a good system of defence
123
System of defence for Great Britain
124
Proposed defensive means for England
125
Section II
126
Objects fur undertaking a siege
127
Causes for the third attempt to reduce Badajos
128
Earthworks of the defenders
129
Obstacles against which the besiegers had to contend
130
Ensuring the success of a siege
131
Position for a besieging force inferior in numbers
132
Causes for the second siege of Badajos
133
Section III
134
Awaiting an enemy within lines
135
Fredericks intrenched camp at Buntzclwitz
136
The camps of Kehl and Dusseldorf The lines of Torres Vedras
137
Occupation of camps by Napoleon 14 Position and capabilities 139
139
Railways for the defence
145
Plti PAGE 7 Impedimenta to the attack 343
146
50
150
Batteries when more subject to the fire of ships
151
r R
171
Use of torpedoes by the Austrians
177
Adsantages of steam conferred on the defenders
183
Landing of Wellingtons army at the mouth of the Mondego river
186
First modern instance of landing in the face of an enemy
187
Departure of the British army for Egypt
189
The landing
191
Landing places selected
192
Results following the plans followed
193
PAB
195
Influences on the use of railways for alleviating sufferings and shortening
201
Railways and improved roads articles for the soldier to carry
204
Direction of invaders attack
210
Line to be preserved 38
214
Method adopted in the Prussian army for communicating orders
216
PAH AO
217
PAS AQ COMBINATIONS OF THE DIFFERENT ARMS 222243
222
Each arm subordinate to its combination with the others
223
Tactics of the battle of Austerlitz the model for a long period
224
Law of modern manoeuvres and battles
225
Avoiding unnecessary exposure of infantry
226
Association of cavalry with artillery
227
Manoeuvring round a flank
229
Manoeuvres and turning movements will be preferred
230
Commanding ground of an enemys line usually the point of attack
231
What should be avoided on a field of battle?
232
Application of tactical talent disconcerting the opponent
233
FAB AOE 27 Wellingtons use of the sixth division as a reserve at Salamanca
234
Taking the initiative in strategy and in tactics relative advantages and disadvantages
235
Obstacles to an attacking force may increase the effects of the fire on them
236
Direction of fire on the defensive and offensive
237
Skirmishers attacking artillery
238
Conditions for offensive and defensive battles
239
Battles dependent on the General and troops
240
Lateness in commencing the battle
241
Expected direction of attack at Koniggratz
242
Suction I
244
Heavy and light weights
250
56
265
Form of Austrian cavalry attacks
267
Adoption of mounted rifles in North America
273
PAR PAOI ARTILLERY 277309
277
Proportion of field artillery to the other arms
278
Maximum number per thousand men 278 7 Numbers at Austerlitz and at Solferino
279
Field artillery organized in batteries
280
Light material and easy movement required
281
Flank fire of Prussian artillery at Koniggriitz
282
Future association with infantry
283
More fully developing the mobility of field guns
284
Means of adaptation of Austrian batteries for the movements of cavalry
285
Reserve Artillery 30 Objects of batteries of position
286
Usual place of reserve artillery
287
Nature of fire against a deployed line
293
Breaching with rifled ordnance 81 Penetration of rifled guns
305
Garrison Artillery 82 In the defence of a fortress 83 Armament of coast batteries 84 Defence of coast batteries
306
Resistance of iron plates Rockets
307
Original rockets 87 Rocket carriages and tubes Hales rockets 88 Service rockets 89 Convenience of rockets
308
CHAPTER IV
310
The company the element of organisation the battalion the unit 311Conditions in the numerical composition of a battalion 5 Movements of Prussian ...
311
Leading part performed by infantry
312
English lines and French columns at Albuera
322
Protracted combat between an English line and Russian column at the Alma
323
Wellingtons system of combat
325
Formation of the 3rd division at Waterloo by battalions formed on the two centre companies
326
Skirmishers attacked at Redinha
332
A position oblique to the line of operation
338
Villages when not to be occupied
344
An army awaiting an attack
345
Napoleons criticism on the position at Waterloo
346
The Austrian position at Koniggriitz
347
Maintenance of communications in rear
348
Position of the Federal army at Gettysburg
349
Russian position at the Alma
350
Lines of battle and orders of battle
351
Lines of formation for the line of battlo
352
Reasons for placing cavalry on the flanks
353
When cavalry may be posted otherwise
354
Positions for artillery
355
Sheltering and masking guns
356
Obtaining the oblique order
362
Salient formation of the Austrians at Prague 307 18 Examples of the convex and salient orders 308
369
31
375
INFANTRY 320
381
5
382
March of Pomeranian hussars in 1866
387
PAR FACE
398
Measures to prevent discovery of a retreat
404
Wellingtons opinion respecting Sir John Moores movement of retreat
410
PAR PAOE 18 Replenishing stores and supplies
412
Retreats favourable before a languid enemy
413
Consequences to Moore and Wellington by the bridges at Mamilla and Poelencia not being broken
414
The command of the rear guard
415
Protection afforded after Austerlitz by artillery
416
Positions taken up by the Austrian artillery
417
Pursuit by the Prussians
418
Soults retreat on Toulouse
419
Retreat of the English army under Sir John Moore on Corunna
420
Cause leading to the battle at Corunna
421
Losses on both sides
422
Reduced state of the Spaniards from want of food Beresfords resolution m holding his position and showing a confident front 38 Retreat of the Prussi...
423
Retreat of the English army from Quatre Bras on Waterloo
424
Hour at which the retirement commenced
425
Withdrawal of the 3rd Division from Quatre Bras
426
Conduct of pursuits
428
PART V
431
Direction of pursuit
432
Character of mountain warfare
437
par roi 5 Principles for selection of defensive points
441
Engagements within a defile
442
Tactical importance of a defile
443
Defending the passage with artillery
445
Passage of the Balkan by the Russians in 1829
446
The Pass of Somosierra forced by Napoleon
448
Attack on the Pass of Biar by the French
450
CHAPTER II
452
Passage of the Rhme in 1800
453
t 4 Positions affording facilities for crossing
454
Effect of increased width of the river
455
General rules for effecting a passage 4S6 7 Advantages of a point on the commanding bank for crossing
457
Napoleons successful passage of the Danube
458
Construction of bridges and batteries preparatory
459
Influential points for facilitating the passage
460
Seizure of a defensible point upon the opposite shore
461
Passage of the Douro by Wellington
462
Observations on the passage
464
Passage of the Garonne at Toulouse 46S Bridge thrown across near Pensaguel
465
Passage below ToiUouse
466
Napoleons passage of the Berezina
468
Directing the line of operation 38
470
Section I
474
Object of a pursuit 429
476
General means of procuring mtelligence
477
Section II
483
CHAPTER IV
489
Tellingoff and placing the advanced posts
490
Pushing posts forward
491
Strengthening outposts
492
Protection of flanks
493
Distances of videttes
494
Number and disposition of troops
495
Composition of troops for outpost duty
496
Fixing the chain of posts
497
Prussian outposts in Waterloo campaign
498
Fires and posting videttes at night
499
Relieving the pickets
500
Section I
502
3
503
PAR
504
Attack by daylight
509
Sorties from houses
510
General rules
516
A1 TAOS 12 Marmonts plan for quelling the insurrection in 1830
518
Its want of mutual cooperation
519
Attack on the Tulieries repulsed
520
Observations on the attack
521
Active measures against houses
522
Paris divided into districts by Cavaignac
523
Defence of Saragossa
524
Means adopted by the defenders for delaying their assailants
525
Probable reasons for the success of the French
526
CHAPTER VII
528
Turenne surprised by Cond6
529
Artificial cover 53O Means of egress and ingress 9 Excavating and obtaining cover
530
Supply of tools for obtaining cover
531
Slight preparation of the ground previous to the battle of the Alma
532
Marlborough at Donauwerth 15 Neglect of intrenching at Albuera
533
Pit TCT 17 Transport of intrenching tools in France
534
CHAPTER VIII
537
Determining the choice
538
shelter from wind
539
Soil affecting health
541
Section II
542
Their classification
543
Waterproof sheet trail flying and swing flying bridge
544
Suspension bridges
545
Passage of Russians over the Dwina
546
Employment for artillery 430
549
Means of transport
552
Utilising camps of instruction
558
262
561
153
564

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 323 - ... bent on the dark columns in their front ; their measured tread shook the ground ; their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation ; their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as foot by foot, and with a horrid carnage, it was driven by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hilL...
Page 410 - In Sir John Moore's campaign," said the Duke of Wellington, " I can see but one error : when he advanced to Sahagun, he should have considered it as a movement of retreat, and sent officers to the rear to mark and prepare the halting places for every brigade.
Page 158 - I made signal to withdraw from action, intending to resume the attack the next morning. During the evening the commanding officers of the iron-clads came on board the flag-ship, and, to my regret, I soon became convinced of the utter impracticability of taking the city of Charleston by the force under my command. No ship had been exposed to the severest fire of the enemy over forty...
Page 323 - Such a gallant line, issuing from the midst of the smoke, and rapidly separating itself from the confused and broken multitude, startled the enemy's heavy masses, which were increasing and pressing onwards as to an assured victory : they wavered, hesitated, and then vomiting forth a storm of fire, hastily endeavoured to enlarge their front, while a fearful discharge of grape from their artillery whistled through the British ranks.
Page 345 - The fact cannot be concealed, however, that all these means are but palliatives; and the best thing for an army standing on the defensive is to know how to take the offensive at a proper time, and to take it. Among the conditions to be satisfied by a defensive position has been mentioned that of enabling an easy and safe retreat; and this brings us to an examination of a question presented by the battle of Waterloo. Would an army with its rear resting upon a forest, and with a good road behind the...
Page 202 - Army Corps, the command aggregating 23,000 men accompanied by its artillery, trains, animals, and baggage from the Rapidan, in Virginia, to Stevenson in Alabama, a distance of 1,192 miles in seven days, crossing the Ohio river twice. 2. The transfer of the...
Page 323 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order, their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as slowly and with a horrid carnage it was pushed by the incessant vigour of the...
Page 540 - In other cases sand is unhealthy, from underlying clay or laterite near the surface, or from being so placed that water rises through its permeable soil from higher levels. Water may then be found within three or four feet of the surface ; and in this.
Page 464 - Some of the citizens now passed over to Villa Nova, with several great boats ; Sherbrooke's people began to cross in large bodies, and at the same moment a loud shout in the town, and the waving of handkerchiefs from all the windows, gave notice that the enemy had abandoned the lower part of the city ; and now also Murray's troops were seen descending the right bank from Avintas.
Page 228 - ... that the most difficult as well as the most certain of all the means the assailant may use to gain the victory consists in strongly supporting the first line with the troops of the second line, and these with the reserve, and in a proper employment of masses of cavalry and of batteries, to assist in striking the decisive blow at the second line of the enemy; for here is presented the greatest of all the problems of the tactics of battles.

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