History of the United States Navy-yard, Portsmouth, N. H. (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1892 - Navy-yards and naval stations - 219 pages
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Page 13 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 185 - David & with his heirs and assigns, that I am lawfully seized in fee of the premises ; that they are free of all incumbrances ; that I have good right to sell and convey the same to the said David to hold as aforesaid.
Page 181 - Snow, his heirs and assigns, forever against the lawful claims and demands of all persons.
Page 5 - I have rather left all then undertake impossibilities, or any more such costly taskes at such chargeable rates: for in neither of those two Countries have I one foot of Land, nor the very house I builded, nor the ground I digged with my...
Page 172 - Esquire, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, have given, granted, bargained, and sold, and by these presents do give, grant, bargain, sell...
Page 172 - I am the lawful owner of the said premises, and am seized and possessed thereof in my own right in fee simple, and have full power and lawful authority to grant and convey the same in manner aforesaid ; that the said premises are free and clear...
Page 173 - CD, his heirs and assigns, that I am lawfully seized in fee of the afore-granted premises ; that they are free of all incumbrances ; that I have good right to...
Page 42 - ... of its depth, so that from the top to the bottom of the union there will be seven stripes, and six stripes from the bottom of the union to the bottom of the flag.
Page 200 - David his heirs and assigns, to his & their use and behoof forever. And I do covenant with the said David & with his heirs and assigns, that I am lawfully seized in fee of the premises...
Page 16 - Jegs and feet of the figure were covered here and there with wreaths of smoke to represent the dangers and difficulties of war. On the stern, under the windows of the great cabin, appeared two large figures in bas-relief, representing tyranny and oppression, bound and biting the ground, with the Cap of Liberty on a pole above their heads.

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