A History of Civilization in Palestine (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The University Press, 1921 - Palestine - 139 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 94 - So we also, when we were children, were held in bondage under the rudiments of the world : but when the fulness of the time came, God sent forth his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, that he might redeem them which were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.
Page 54 - We are inclined", says Professor Macalister, "to picture the West as a thing of yesterday, new fangled with its inventions and its progressive civilization, and the East as an embodiment of hoary and unchanging traditions. But when West first met East on the shores of the Holy Land, it was the former which represented the magnificent traditions of the past, and the latter which looked forward to the future. The Philistines were of the remnant of the dying glories of Crete; the Hebrews had no past...
Page 58 - ... Philistines, sprung from one of the great homes of art of the ancient world, had brought with them the artistic instincts of their race: decayed no doubt, but still superior to anything they met with in the land itself. Tombs to be ascribed to them, found in Gezer, contained beautiful jewellery and ornaments. The Philistines, in fact, were the only cultured or artistic race who ever occupied the soil of Palestine...
Page 79 - THE RELIGIOUS CONSCIOUSNESS IN ISRAEL PALESTINE was the scene of the historical events round which our Faith is crystallised ; herein lies the especial importance of the country ; and no view of its civilization would be complete unless an endeavour be made to trace the steps by which its unique position was attained. The subject, however, cannot be adequately treated in a single chapter of a small book, and in such limits very little novelty is possible. The statement often made in popular books...
Page 10 - Manuel (Varcheologie prehistorique, celtique, et gallo-romaine, Vol. I. (Paris, Picard, 1908). See also Sollas, Ancient Hunters (Macmillan, 1911). Palaeolithic man in Palestine missed, however, the higher developments attained by his brother in France. The former country has yielded nothing comparable with the splendid chipped flints of Solutr^ and its allied stations ; nor has the least trace of the exuberant art of the Magdalenian caves of the Pyrenees and elsewhere as yet come to light in the...
Page 32 - Europe have within the last century quickened it once more to life. From first to last there was not a native potter in Palestine who could so much as invent a new design to paint on his waterpots. There was not an armourer who could invent a new pattern of sword or arrowhead. The modern peasants live in houses practically identical in style and construction with those which sheltered the peasants of 2000 BC a community of white ants could not be more unprogressive.
Page 60 - Philistines carefully retained the monopoly of working in the new metal and except the king and the king's son no one was able to procure an iron sword: all had to make shift with ox-goads or other agricultural implements. The passage asserts almost in as many words that the Hebrews were still in the Bronze, the Philistines already in the Iron Age. The break-up of the Philistine domination removed the embargo on the new metal, and when David was on the throne its use became general. With the...
Page 84 - Eamadan fast, and the toilsome pilgrimage to Mecca. In studying the religious development of the Hebrews, two important points must be emphasised from the first. Israel was surrounded by the traditions of five great empires Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, the Hittites, and the Cretans. Directly or indirectly the Hebrews drew the whole of their secular arts, even the simplest, from one or other of these, as we have already seen: and in all material matters, peaceable or warlike, these empires were...
Page 101 - ... modern Bittir, near Jerusalem, where the fortress garrisoned by them still remains, under the name Khurbet el-Yahud, or "Ruin of the Jews" and were there defeated and slaughtered in a sanguinary encounter. Hadrian then turned Jerusalem into a Roman colony, changed its name to Aelia Capitolina, built a temple of Jupiter on the site of the Jewish temple and (it is alleged) a temple of Venus on Mt. Golgotha and forbade any Jew, on pain of death, to appear within sight of the city. This disaster...

Bibliographic information