Prefaces. The tempest. The two gentlemen of Verona. The merry wives of Windsor.- v.2. Measure for measure. Comedy of errors. Much ado about nothing. Love's labour lost.- v.3. Midsummer night's dream. Merchant of Venice. As you like it. Taming the shrew.- v.4. All's well that ends well. Twelfth night. Winter's tale. Macbeth.- v.5 King John. King Richrd II. King Henry IV, parts I-II.- v.6. King Henry V. King Henry VI, parts I-III.- v.7 King Richard III. King Henry VIII. Coriolanus.- v.8. Julius Cęsar. Anthony and Cleopatra. Timon of Athens. Titus Andronicus.- v. 9. Troilus and Cressida. Cymbeline. King Lear.- v. 10. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, 1778
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Page 294 - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love.
Page 100 - To hear the solemn curfew ; by whose aid (Weak masters though ye be) I have be-dimm'd The noontide sun, call'd forth the mutinous winds, And 'twixt the green sea and the azur'd vault Set roaring war : to the dread rattling thunder Have I given fire, and rifted Jove's stout oak With his own bolt...
Page 65 - Hence, bashful cunning ! And prompt me, plain and holy innocence ! I am your wife, if you will marry me ; If not, I'll die your maid : to be your fellow You may deny me ; but I'll be your servant, Whether you will or no.
Page 19 - A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world and was content to lose it.
Page 53 - Perhaps the lightness of the matter may conduce to the vehemence of the agency; when the truth to be investigated is so near to inexistence, as to escape attention, its bulk is to be enlarged by rage and exclamation: That to which all would be indifferent in its original state, may attract notice when the fate of a name is appended to it.
Page 217 - Above the ill fortune of them, or the need. I therefore will begin: Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Page 29 - You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse : The red plague rid you, For learning me your language ! Pro.
Page 11 - Tragedy was not in those times a poem of more general dignity or elevation than comedy; it required only a calamitous conclusion, with which the common criticism of that age was satisfied, whatever lighter pleasure it afforded in its progress.
Page 231 - This pencil take (she said) whose colours clear Richly paint the vernal year : Thine, too, these golden keys, immortal Boy ! This can unlock the gates of Joy ; Of Horror that, and thrilling Fears, Or ope the sacred source of sympathetic Tears.
Page 4 - Shakespeare is, above all writers, at least above all modern writers, the poet of nature, the poet that holds up to his readers a faithful mirror of manners and of life.

References from web pages

Internet Archive: Details: The plays of William Shakespeare in ten ...
The plays of William Shakespeare in ten volumes, with corrections and illustrations of various commentators (Volume 9) (1778) ...
www.archive.org/ details/ playsofwilliamsh09shakiala

Shakespeare's Editors - Steevens
The plays of William Shakespeare in ten volumes, with corrections and illustrations of various commentators; to which are added Notes by Samuel Johnson and ...
shakespeare.palomar.edu/ Editors/ Steevens.htm

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