Inventing Accuracy: A Historical Sociology of Nuclear Missile Guidance

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MIT Press, 1993 - History - 464 pages
5 Reviews

Donald MacKenzie follows one line of technology - strategic ballistic missile guidance through a succession of weapons systems to reveal the workings of a world that is neither awesome nor unstoppable. He uncovers the parameters, the pressures, and the politics that make up the complex social construction of an equally complex technology.Donald MacKenzie is Reader in Sociology at the University of Edinburgh.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jorgearanda - LibraryThing

This is an exhaustive account of the development of nuclear missile guidance technology in the US and the USSR. It is mostly dry, and (unless this is your area of interest) exceedingly detailed ... Read full review

Review: Inventing Accuracy: A Historical Sociology of Nuclear Missile Guidance

User Review  - Andy Love - Goodreads

This is a very detailed history of inertial navigation/guidance and how the development and refinement of this technology intertwines with the development of intercontinental ballistic missiles (and ... Read full review

Contents

Inventing a Black Box
27
3
95
Epilogue
106
4
165
5
240
The Soviet Union and Strategic Missile Guidance
297
7
340
8
382
Uninventing the Bomb
424
Appendix C
440
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Donald MacKenzie is Professor of Sociology (Personal Chair) at the University of Edinburgh. His books include Inventing Accuracy (1990), Knowing Machines (1996), and Mechanizing Proof (2001), all published by the MIT Press. Portions of An Engine, not a Camera won the Viviana A. Zelizer Prize in economic sociology from the American Sociological Association.

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