Taking the Bastile

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Kessinger Publishing, May 1, 2005 - Fiction - 628 pages
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1902. Illustrated with drawings on wood by eminent French and American artists. Dumas, French novelist and playwright, is now primarily recognized for his historical novels, which include the ever popular Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo. The novel begins: On the borders of Picardy and the province of Soissons, and on that part of the national territory which, under the name of the Isle of France, formed a portion of the ancient patrimony of our kings, and in the center of an immense crescent formed by a forest of fifty thousand acres which stretches its horns to the north and south, rises almost buried amid the shades of a vast park planted by Francis I and Henry II, the small city of Villers-Cotterets. This place is celebrated from having given birth to Charles Albert Demoustier, who, at the period when our present history commences, was there writing his Letters to Emilie, on Mythology, to the unbounded satisfaction of the pretty women of those days, who eagerly snatched his publications from one another as soon as printed. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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About the author (2005)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

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