Trends in Outside Support for Insurgent Movements (Google eBook)

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Rand Corporation, Nov 20, 2001 - Political Science - 164 pages
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The most useful forms of outside support for an insurgent movement include safe havens, financial support, political backing, and direct military assistance. Because states are able to provide all of these types of assistance, their support has had a profound impact on the effectiveness of many rebel movements since the end of the Cold War. However, state support is no longer the only, or indeed necessarily the most important, game in town. Diasporas have played a particularly important role in sustaining several strong insurgencies. More rarely, refugees, guerrilla groups, or other types of non-state supporters play a significant role in creating or sustaining an insurgency, offering fighters, training, or other forms of assistance. This report assesses post-Cold War trends in external support for insurgent movements. It describes the frequency that states, diasporas, refugees, and other non-state actors back guerrilla movements. It also assesses the motivations of these actors and which types of support matter most. This book concludes by assessing the implications for analysts of insurgent movements.
  

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Contents

Chapter One INTRODUCTION
1
Chapter Two STATE SUPPORT FOR INSURGENCIES
9
Chapter Three DIASPORA SUPPORT FOR INSURGENCIES
41
Chapter Four REFUGEE SUPPORT FOR INSURGENCIES
61
Chapter Five OTHER NONSTATE SUPPORTERS OF INSURGENCIES
71
Chapter Six ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF EXTERNAL SUPPORT
83
Chapter Seven IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF INSURGENCY
103
Appendix A OUTSIDE SUPPORT FOR INSURGENCIES 19912000
109
Appendix B THE LTTEs MILITARYRELATED PROCUREMENT
117
REFERENCES
123
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About the author (2001)

Daniel Byman is Assistant Professor in the Security Program of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has published widely on issues related to terrorism, Middle East politics, and national security. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution and has served on the staff of the '9/11 Commission', among other positions. He is the author of The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might (2002), and Keeping the Peace: Lasting Solutions to Ethnic Conflicts (2002).

Peter Chalk is a policy analyst with the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California.

Bruce Hoffman has been studying terrorism and counterterrorism for more than three decades and has been an adviser to the U.S. and other governments and businesses.

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