The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., Bishop of Cloyne: Including His Letters to Thomas Prior, Esq., Dean Gervais, Mr. Pope, &c., &c. ; to which is Prefixed an Account of His Life, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Thomas Tegg, 1843 - Philosophy, Modern
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Page 457 - The prophet that hath a dream, let him tell a dream : and he that hath my word let him speak my word faithfully. What is the chaff to the wheat ? saith the Lord. Is not my word like as a fire ? saith the Lord ; and like a hammer that breaketh the rock in pieces ? Therefore, behold, I am against the prophets, saith the Lord, that steal my words, every one from his neighbour.
Page 451 - Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? Why are they then baptized for the dead?
Page 308 - Hence, the belief of a God, the immortality of the soul, and a future state of rewards and punishments have been esteemed useful engines of government.
Page 88 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Page 100 - ... substance be taken in the vulgar sense, for a combination of sensible qualities, such as extension, solidity, weight, and the like this we cannot be accused of taking away ; but if it be taken in a philosophic sense, for the support of accidents or qualities without the mind then indeed I acknowledge that we take it away, if one may be said to take away that which never had any existence, not even in the imagination.
Page 282 - Suppose a man born blind, and now adult, and taught by his touch to distinguish between a cube and a sphere of the same metal, and nighly of the same bigness, so as to tell, when he felt one and the other, which is the cube, which the sphere. Suppose then the cube and sphere placed on a table, and the blind man to be made to see; quaere, whether by his sight, before he touched them, he could now distinguish and tell which is the globe, which the cube?
Page 145 - Ye who turn judgment to wormwood, and leave off righteousness in the earth, seek him that maketh the seven stars and Orion, and turneth the shadow of death into the morning, and maketh the day dark with night: that calleth for the waters of the sea, and poureth them out upon the face of the earth: The Lord is his name: that strengtheneth the spoiled against the strong, so that the spoiled shall come against the fortress.
Page 111 - The fire which I see is not the cause of the pain I suffer upon my approaching it, but the mark that forewarns me of it.
Page 147 - ... the eyes of the Lord are in every place beholding the evil and the good...
Page 97 - When in broad daylight I open my eyes, it is not in my power to choose whether I shall see or no, or to determine what particular objects shall present themselves to my view; and so likewise as to the hearing and other senses, the ideas imprinted on them are not creatures of my will. There is therefore some other Will or Spirit that produces them.

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