Imagine Nation: The American Counterculture of the 1960s and '70s

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Peter Braunstein, Michael William Doyle
Psychology Press, 2002 - History - 398 pages
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Fourteen essays examine the many elements of the American counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s, with its underlying theme of the rejection by mainly young but also older people of prevailing political, social, and cultural norms through experimentation with drugs, sex, music, and identity, to construct alternative ways of life. The essays, written by academics and journalists, are arranged into sections covering cultural politics, racial and sexual identity, the media and popular culture, the deconditioning of the human mind through drugs and feminist consciousness-raising, and alternative visions of society based on technology and communal living.
  

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Imagine nation: the American counterculture of the 1960s and '70s

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This deep and detailed work examines the many elements of the American counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s. Its underlying theme is the rejection by mainly young but also older people of ... Read full review

Contents

Deconditioning
15
THE INTOXICATED STATEILLEGAL NATION DRUGS IN THE SIXTIES COUNTERCULTURE
17
FROM CONSCIOUSNESS EXPANSION TO CONSCIOUSNESS RAISING FEMINISM AND THE COUNTERCULTURE
41
Cultural Politics
69
STAGING THE REVOLUTION GUERRILLA THEATER AS A COUNTERCULTURAL PRACTICE 196568
71
THE REVOLUTION IS ABOUT OUR LIVE THE NEW LEFTS COUNTERCULTURE
99
THE WHITE PANTHERS TOTAL ASSAULT ON THE CULTURE
125
Identity
157
Pop Culture and mass
241
FOREVER YOUNG INSURGENT YOUTH AND THE SIXTIES CULTURE OF REJUVENATION
243
THE MOVIES ARE A REVOLUTION FILM AND THE COUNTERCULTURE
275
SEX AS A WEAPON UNDERGROUND COMIX AND THE PARADOX OF LIBERATION
305
Alternative Visions
325
THE SIXTIESERA COMMUNES
327
MACHINES OF LOVING GRACE ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT AND THE COUNTERCULTURE
353
CONTRIBUTORS
379

COUNTERCULTURE INDIANS AND THE NEW AGE
159
VOODOO CHILD JIMI HENDRIX
189
GAY GATHERINGS REIMAGINING THE COUNTERCULTURE
215

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About the author (2002)

Peter Braunstein is a journalist and cultural historian based in New York City. He writes about fashion, film, celebrity, the 1960s, music, technology, and pop culture for such publications as the Village Voice, Forbes, American Heritage, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Women's Wear Daily, W, and culturefront. He received his M.A. from New York University in 1992, having written a thesis on the Haight-Ashbury counterculture.
Michael William Doyle worked in the new-wave food co-op movement during the 1970s while living communally on an organic farm he helped found in Wisconsin. He went on to earn a B.A. at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1989), and a Ph.D. at Cornell University (1997). He is currently Assistant Professor of History at Ball State University at Muncie, Indiana. He is the author of Free Radicals: The Haight-Ashbury Diggers and the American Counterculture in the 1960s.

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