Observations on Several Parts of the Counties of Cambridge, Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex. Also on Several Parts of North Wales: Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, in Two Tours. The Former Made in the Year 1769. The Latter in the Year 1773 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell and W. Davis, 1809 - England - 208 pages
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Page 126 - ... irregularity in it's general form. We judge of beauty in castles, as we do in figures, in mountains, and other objects. The solid, square, heavy form, we dislike; and are pleased with the pyramidal one, which may be infinitely varied; and which ruin contributes to vary. Secondly, a pile gains from a state of ruin, an irregularity in it's parts. The cornice, the window, the arch, and battlement, which in their original form are all regular, receive from ruin a variety of little irregularities,...
Page 126 - It gains irregularity in it's general form. We judge of beauty in castles, as we do in figures, in mountains, and other objects. The solid, square, heavy form, we dislike; and are pleased with the pyramidal one, which may be infinitely varied; and which ruin contributes to vary. Secondly, a pile gains from a state of ruin, an irregularity in it's parts. The cornice, the window, the arch, and battlement, which in their original form are all regular, receive from ruin a variety of little irregularities,...
Page 4 - Et craffum unguentum, et Sardo cum melle papaver 375 Offendunt; poterat duci quia coena fine iftis: Sic animis natum inventumque poema juvandis, Si paulum fummo decefllt, vergit ad imum.
Page 29 - In many places we saw the sand even driven into ridges ; and the road totally covered, which indeed was everywhere so deep and heavy, that four horses which we were obliged to take could scarce in the slowest pace drag us through it. It was a little surprising to find such a piece of absolute desert almost in the heart of...
Page 84 - I believe a houfe is now built, which intercepts the view. the eaftern fide of it, and defends it like a ditch. The other parts are furrounded by a wall. It is a well-built, agreeable town. You fee order in every part. The great church is a Saxon pile ; but good architecture of the kind. The cloifters are very noble. The...
Page 125 - ... the corner of the picture; which would ease it of some of it's regular towers: and to cut down part of the wood on the opposite bank, which would remove, in some degree, it's heaviness. As the wood, in fact, is periodically cut down, this liberty is very allowable. The picture might be improved also by planting a tree or two on the foreground; and hiding part of the regularity by their branches. As we approach the castle in the ferry-boat, the point of view of course frequently varies, and often...
Page 50 - When we see such a portrait as this, by Vandyck, and in the same collection, one of his historical pieces (the Holy Family...
Page 193 - ... the king's feet. — To endeavour to rescue a friend in battle, where the chance may be equal, is a slight effort, in comparison with this, where a certain blow is received, without any idea of self-defence. — The king, as may be supposed, was overwhelmed with grief; and had no way left of showing his gratitude, but by taking St. Clare's infant daughter under his protection — giving her a princely education; and obtaining for her an honourable match.152 «• Gentleman's Mag., LXXVIII, Pt.
Page 126 - ... are all regular, receive from ruin a variety of little irregularities, which the eye examines with renewed delight. Lastly, a pile in a state of ruin receives the richest decorations from the various colours, which it acquires from time. It receives the stains of weather; the incrustations of moss; and the varied tints of flowering weeds. The Gothic window is hung with festoons of ivy; the arch with pendent wreaths streaming from each broken coigne; and the summit of the wall is planted with...
Page 126 - ... a state of ruin, an irregularity in it's parts. The cornice, the window, the arch, and battlement, which in their original form are all regular, receive from ruin a variety of little irregularities, which the eye examines with renewed delight. Lastly, a pile in a state of ruin receives the richest decorations from the various colours, which it acquires from time. It receives the stains of weather; the incrustations of moss; and the varied tints of flowering weeds. The Gothic window is hung with...

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