Travels in the Interior of Africa, to the Sources of the Senegal and Gambia: Performed by Command of the French Government, in the Year 1818 (Google eBook)

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Henry Colburn & Company, 1820 - Africa, West - 378 pages
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Page 167 - WOMEN. 167 what bowed ; they are seldom so stout as the Negresses. They load their hair with ornaments of yellow amber and coral, and, their necks with gold or glass beads ; over the head they throw a muslin veil ; some wear a jacket with sleeves ; like the Negro women they have a cloth fastened round the waist. Lively...
Page 234 - ... of my research, rose in the midst of this plain, which drought had despoiled of its verdure. " When I entered that which covers the source of the Rio Grande, I was seized with a feeling of awe, as if I was approaching one of the sacred springs where Paganism placed the residence of its Divinities. " Trees, coeval with the river, render it invisible to the eyes of those who do not penetrate into this wood ; its source gushes from the bosom of the earth, and runs north-north-east, passing over...
Page 263 - ... one above the other, from which the water gushed forth, and still higher a third, which was only humid, as well as the channel that led to the basin immediately below it. The Negroes consider the upper basin as the principal source of the river. These three springs were situated about the middle of the side of the mountain. In the rainy season two ponds, at equal distances above the upper source, supply it with water by two deep channels.
Page 236 - ... by which the rivers run off ; man has never dared to use the axe in the woods which overshadow these two springs, because the natives believe them to be inhabited by spirits ; their respect for these places is carried to such a pitch, that they are careful not to enter them, and if any one had seen me penetrate within them, I should infallibly have been put to death. " From the situation of these two sources, in a basin, between high mountains, covered with ferruginous stones and cinders, and...
Page 377 - ... two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen...
Page 41 - I measured one, and found it to be forty feet in circumference. Stripped at this time of its foliage, it resembled an immense wooden tower. This majestic mass is the only monument of antiquity to be met with in Africa. I am astonished that the Negroes have not paid to this tree the same honours that the Druids did to the oak ; for to them the baobab is perhaps the most valuable of vegetables. Its leaves are used for leaven ; its bark furnishes indestructible cordage, and the bees form their hives...
Page 380 - Narrative of a Voyage to Senegal, in 1816, undertaken by order of the French Government ; comprising an Account of the Shipwreck of the Medusa Frigate, the Sufferings of the Crew, and the various Occurrences on board the Raft, in the Desert of Zaara, at St.
Page 290 - ... they fired at them, killed ten, and wounded others, which were brought to them by the dogs ; but several negroes were severely wounded in this encounter, either by the stones hurled at them by the apes, or by their bites ; the females especially were most furious in revenging the death of their young ones, which they carried in their arms.
Page 263 - Mandingo, which has the same signification, or Foura, which means simply the river, runs at first from north to south, then passes at a little distance to the south of Timbo, and afterwards pursues a western direction. On one of the trees near its sources, I engraved the date of the year in which I made this discovery. Having rejoined Ali, who...

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